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Time between overhaul (abbreviated as TBO or TBOH) is the manufacturer's recommended number of running hours or calendar time before an aircraft engine or other component requires overhaul.[1] On rotorcraft many components have recommended or mandatory TBOs, including main rotor blades, tail rotor blades and gearboxes. For engines the time between overhauls is generally a function of the complexity of the engine and how it is used.[1] Piston-based engines are much more complex than turbine-powered engines, and generally have TBOs on the order of 1,200 to 2,000 hours of running time. They tend toward the lower number if they are new designs, or include boosting options like a turbocharger. In comparison, jet engines and turboprops often have TBOs on the order of 3,000 to 5,000 hours. Since overhauling needs the engine to be taken apart, it is typically expensive. The value of a used engine decreases if it is close to needing an overhaul, so used engines (and aircraft) typically list their time since overhaul or TSOH. The TBO is a time 'recommended' by the manufacturer and, depending upon what rules the aircraft operates under, overhauling the engine at this time is not necessarily mandatory. For aircraft used non-commercially overhauls are not mandatory, but highly recommended. Likewise, overhaul at the recommended TBO does not guarantee that the engine will last that long.[1] References[edit]

^ a b c Teledyne Continental Motors
Teledyne Continental Motors
(17 November 1998). "Time Between Overhaul Periods" (PDF). Retrieved 3 January 2015. 

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Aircraft piston engine components, systems and terminology

Piston
Piston
engines

Mechanical components

Camshaft Connecting rod Crankpin Crankshaft Cylinder Cylinder head Gudgeon pin Hydraulic tappet Main bearing Obturator ring Oil pump Piston Piston
Piston
ring Poppet valve Pushrod Rocker arm Sleeve valve Tappet

Electrical components

Alternator Capacitor discharge ignition Dual ignition Electronic fuel injection Generator Ignition system Magneto Spark plug Starter

Terminology

Air-cooled Aircraft engine
Aircraft engine
starting Bore Compression ratio Dead centre Engine displacement Four-stroke engine Horsepower Ignition timing Manifold pressure Mean effective pressure Naturally aspirated Monosoupape Overhead camshaft Overhead valve engine Rotary engine Shock cooling Stroke Time between overhaul Two-stroke engine Valve timing Volumetric efficiency

Propellers

Components

Propeller governor Propeller speed reduction unit Spinner

Terminology

Autofeather Blade pitch Constant-speed Contra-rotating Counter-rotating Scimitar Single-blade Variable-pitch

Engine instruments

Annunciator panel EFIS EICAS Flight data recorder Glass cockpit Hobbs meter Tachometer

Engine controls

Carburetor
Carburetor
heat Throttle

Fuel and induction system

Avgas Carburetor Fuel injection Gascolator Inlet manifold Intercooler Pressure carburetor Supercharger Turbocharger Updraft carburetor

Other systems

Auxiliary power unit Coffman starter Hydraulic system Ice protection system Recoil start

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