Parouse.com
 Parouse.com



Selsley
Selsley
is a village within the civil parish of King's Stanley
King's Stanley
and district of Stroud, in Gloucestershire, England. It is composed of around 175 houses, scattered around the western and eastern edge of a Cotswold
Cotswold
spur, located approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Stroud. Selsley Common
Selsley Common
is an ancient place, but the name Selsley
Selsley
was only used for the settlement after the parish was created in 1863, with the village divided into Selsley
Selsley
West and Selsley. Previously Selsley
Selsley
West was a series of hamlets known as Stanley End, Picked (or Peaked) Elm and The Knapp, with The Knapp near present day Middleyard, Stanley End closer to the modern Selsley
Selsley
village, and Picked Elm the houses near Peaked Elm Farm[1].

Contents

1 Houses 2 Historic tracks 3 Geography and geology 4 Church of All Saints 5 Selsley
Selsley
Common

5.1 History 5.2 Site of Special
Special
Scientific Interest

5.2.1 Geology 5.2.2 Biology

6 References 7 External links

Houses[edit] Stanley Park is the original manor house in Selsley
Selsley
West dating from the time of Elizabeth I. The house was rebuilt in the mid-18th century and then further remodelled when it was bought by Samuel Marling in 1850[1]. In 1952, the house and estate was sold by the Marling family, with the house divided into flats[1]. Elsewhere in the village, architecture indicates that most of the older housing dates from the 18th and 19th century[2], interspersed with 20th-century build. Historic tracks[edit] Running through the village is Water Lane - a prehistoric track that winds its way to North Woodchester
Woodchester
and thence to South Woodchester
Woodchester
and on to Bath. In parts, its banks tower ten feet overhead, cloaked by hedges of hawthorn, blackthorn, ash and beech. Spring water rushes along the two sides of the lane where the geology changes. It runs parallel to a track continuing from Bell Lane and going past a cottage down over the brook and onto the Villiers estate in Woodchester. Geography and geology[edit] The western scarp face falls hundreds of feet to the flat Severn Valley. Beyond the Forest lie the Black Mountains and beyond these the Brecon Beacons. Also located on the scarp is a Bronze Age
Bronze Age
barrow. Church of All Saints[edit] Main article: Selsley
Selsley
Church

Selsley
Selsley
Church

Alongside the manor house lies Selsley
Selsley
Church, commissioned by the Marling family during the mid-19th century and modelled by Bodley in the French Gothic style. Its stained glass was one of the first commissions undertaken by William Morris
William Morris
and his partners Rossetti, Webb, Ford Madox Brown and Burne-Jones. The design of the church derives from the squires' name. The church is modelled on one seen in Marlengo (Marling) in the disputed area of the Italian Tyrol. Selsley
Selsley
Common[edit] History[edit] Despite attempts to enclose the common at Selsley, it has been vigorously defended over the years. The first recorded dispute was in the Saxon period,[citation needed] and the threat to enclose the common in the 19th century met with vocal public outrage. There is one area which did become enclosed, known locally as 'Dead Man's Acre'. The story goes that a man was told that he could have as much land of the common that he could enclose in one day. The effort though, proved too much, and killed him.[citation needed] The truth of this tale is dubious, as it bears similarities to works of fiction such as Leo Tolstoy's How Much Land Does a Man Need? Dotted over the common are the long abandoned remains of quarries once used to supply stone for local building and walling. Lesser hollows are the remains of a medieval soldier's camp - so identified in 1942 by Captain H.S. Gracie.[citation needed] In addition, the grassed-over ways used by the quarry wagons can still be seen. Site of Special
Special
Scientific Interest[edit]

Selsley
Selsley
Common

Site of Special
Special
Scientific Interest

Selsley
Selsley
Common

Area of Search Gloucestershire

Grid reference SO829030

Interest Biological/Geological

Area 39.4 hectare

Notification 1966

Natural England
England
website

Selsley Common
Selsley Common
(grid reference SO829030) is a 39.4-hectare (97-acre) biological and geological Site of Special Scientific Interest
Site of Special Scientific Interest
in Gloucestershire, notified in 1966.[3] It is a large open expanse and a rich habitat for rare flora and fauna. During the summer, bird song mingles with the sound of cattle as commoners can, and still do, exercise grazing rights. The common and village are in the Cotswold
Cotswold
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and overlies the Jurassic
Jurassic
limestone of the Cotswolds. It supports herb-rich calcareous grassland habitat. Leigh’s Quarry, which is in the southern part of the SSSI, is of particular geological significance.[3] The site is listed in the ‘ Stroud
Stroud
District’ Local Plan, adopted November 2005, Appendix 6 (online for download) as an SSSI and a Regionally Important Geological Site (RIGS).[4] Geology[edit] The quarry provides one of the most extensive, and thus significant, cross-sections of the Middle Jurassic
Jurassic
Inferior Oolite
Inferior Oolite
in the south of the Cotswolds. Oolite Marl, Upper Trigonia Grit and Clypeus Grit are in the succession. This is a site with a notable example of hardground, which is a thin layer of rough limestone formed during environmental changes.[3] Biology[edit] The grassland is dominated by grasses such as upright brome, sheep's fescue, and there is little tor-grass. The latter makes the common different from others in the region. Herbs include rock-rose, common bird's-foot-trefoil, salad burnet and wild thyme. Orchids are in abundance including autumn lady's tresses, green-winged orchid and fragrant orchid, particularly in the quarry areas. There are scrub areas of hawthorn and there some trees such as ash.[3] The habitat supports a range of invertebrates including the mollusc Abida secale, and butterflies. The latter include small blue, grayling and Duke of Burgundy fritillary.[3] References[edit]

^ a b c Bown, Stephen (2000). Old Selsley. Stonehouse, Glos: Zeta Printing Services.  ^ Yorke, Trevor (2015). The Cotswold
Cotswold
Cottage. Newbury, Berks: Countryside Books.  ^ a b c d e Natural England
England
SSSI information for citation, map and unit detail ^ Stroud District
Stroud District
Local Plan, adopted November 2005, Appendix 6 ‘Sites of Nature Conservation Interest’ Archived 6 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit] Media related to Selsley
Selsley
at Wikimedia Commons

Natural England
England
(SSSI information) Stroud
Stroud
Voices ( Selsley
Selsley
filter) - oral history site

Selsley
Selsley
Common

Quarries on Selsley
Selsley
Common

Quarries on Selsley
Selsley
Common

Selsley Common
Selsley Common
and Hill

View of Selsley Common
Selsley Common
from Rodborough

View looking to Rodborough

View to Pen Hill

Orchids on Selsley
Selsley
Common

v t e

Ceremonial county of Gloucestershire

Unitary authorities

South Gloucestershire

Boroughs or districts

Cheltenham Cotswold Forest of Dean Gloucester Stroud Tewkesbury

Major settlements

Berkeley Bradley Stoke Cheltenham Chipping Campden Chipping Sodbury Cinderford Cirencester Coleford Dursley Fairford Filton Gloucester Kingswood Lechlade Lydney Minchinhampton Mitcheldean Moreton-in-Marsh Nailsworth Newent Northleach Painswick Patchway Quedgeley Stonehouse Stow-on-the-Wold Stroud Tetbury Tewkesbury Thornbury Winchcombe Wotton-under-Edge Yate See also: List of civil parishes in Gloucestershire

Rivers

Bristol Avon Warwickshire Avon Bybrook Boyd Cam Chelt Churn Coln Evenlode Eye Bristol Frome Stroud
Stroud
Frome Hazel Brook Leach Little Avon Lyd Severn Swilgate Thames Trym Windrush Wye

Topics

Flag Places Population of major settlements Parliamentary constituencies Schools SSSIs Country houses Grade I listed buildings Grade II* listed buildings History Lord Lieutenants High Sheriffs Museums

v t e

Biological Sites of Special Scientific Interest
Biological Sites of Special Scientific Interest
in Gloucestershire

Summarised data for all sites (biological and geological)

Ashleworth Ham Astridge Wood Badgeworth Barnsley Warren Barton Bushes Bigsweir Woods Blaisdon Hall Bourton Down Box Farm Meadows Boxwell Brassey Brooks Head Grove Buckshraft Mine & Bradley Railway Tunnel Bull Cross, The Frith and Juniper Hill Bushley Muzzard, Brimpsfield Caerwood and Ashberry Goose House Chaceley Meadow Clarke's Pool Meadow Cleeve Common Cockleford Marsh Collinpark Wood Coombe Hill Canal Coombe Hill Cotswold
Cotswold
Commons and Beechwoods Cotswold
Cotswold
Water Park Crickley Hill and Barrow Wake Daneway Banks Dean Hall Coach House & Cellar Devil's Chapel Scowles Dingle Wood Dixton Wood Dymock Woods Edge Common Elmlea Meadows Frampton Pools Highbury Wood Hobbs Quarry Hornsleasow Roughs Hucclecote Meadows Innsworth Meadow Juniper Hill, Edgeworth Kempley Daffodil Meadow Kingscote and Horsley Woods Lark Wood Leckhampton Hill and Charlton Kings Common Lineover Wood Lower Woods Lower Wye Gorge May Hill Midger Minchinhampton
Minchinhampton
Common Nagshead Old Bow and Old Ham Mines Old River Severn, Upper Lode Pennsylvania Fields, Sedbury Poor's Allotment Puckham Woods Range Farm Fields River Wye Rodborough Common Rough Bank, Miserden Salmonsbury Meadows Selsley
Selsley
Common Severn Estuary Severn Ham, Tewkesbury Shorn Cliff and Caswell Woods Slade Brook Soudley Ponds Speech House Oaks Stenders Quarry Stinchcombe
Stinchcombe
Hill Strawberry Banks Swanpool Wood and Furnace Grove Swift's Hill Sylvan House Barn The Hudnalls The Malvern Hills Tudor Farm Bank Turvey's Piece Upper Severn Estuary Upham Meadow and Summer Leasow Upper Wye Gorge Walmore Common Westbury Brook Ironstone Mine Whelford Meadow Wigpool Ironstone Mine Wildmoorway Meadows Winson Meadows Woodchester
Woodchester
Park Workman's Wood Wotton Hill Yarley Meadows

Neighbouring areas Avon Hereford and Worcester Oxfordshire Wiltshire

v t e

Geological Sites of Special Scientific Interest
Geological Sites of Special Scientific Interest
in Gloucestershire

Summarised data for all sites (biological and geological)

Alderton Hill Quarry Bull Cross, The Frith and Juniper Hill Campden Tunnel Gravel Pit Cleeve Common Coaley Wood Quarries Crickley Hill and Barrow Wake Easter Park Farm Quarry Edgehills Quarry Foss Cross Quarry Garden Cliff Hampen Railway Cutting Haresfield Beacon Harford Railway Cutting Hobbs Quarry Hornsleasow Quarry Huntsman's Quarry Jackdaw Quarry Kemble Railway Cuttings Knap House Quarry, Birdlip Land Grove Quarry, Mitcheldean Leckhampton Hill and Charlton Kings Common Longhope Hill Lower Woods Lower Wye Gorge Lydney
Lydney
Cliff May Hill Meezy Hurst Minchinhampton
Minchinhampton
Common New Park Quarry Nibley Knoll Notgrove Railway Cutting Oakenhill Railway Cutting Puddlebrook Quarry River Wye Robin's Wood Hill Quarry Rodborough Common Salmonsbury Meadows Scully Grove Quarry Severn Estuary Slade Brook Stenders Quarry Stony Furlong Railway Cutting Swift's Hill Upper Severn Estuary The Malvern Hills Purton Passage Selsley
Selsley
Common Upper Wye Gorge Veizey's Quarry Wainlode Cliff Wellacre Quarry Wood Green Quarry & Railway Cutting Wotton Hill

Neighbouring areas Avon Hereford and Worcester Oxf