Parouse.com
 Parouse.com



Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township is a township in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States
United States
Census, the township's population was 20,065,[10][11][12] reflecting an increase of 4,120 (+25.8%) from the 15,945 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,612 (+19.6%) from the 13,333 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] The 2010 population was the highest recorded in any decennial census.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Founding 1.2 Tuckerton Wireless Tower 1.3 Later history

2 Geography 3 Demographics

3.1 Census 2010 3.2 Census 2000

4 Government

4.1 Local government

4.1.1 Emergency services

4.2 Federal, state and county representation 4.3 Politics

5 Education 6 Transportation

6.1 Roads and highways 6.2 Public transportation

7 Notable people 8 References 9 External links

History[edit] Founding[edit] Originally part of Burlington County, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
took its name from the portion of a bay called Egg Harbor (known today as Little Egg Harbor) by the Dutch sailors because of the eggs found in nearby gull nests. The first known account of the town was made by Captain Cornelius Jacobsen May in 1614.[21][22] The first European to settle the township was Hendrick Jacobs Falkenberg, who likely arrived by 1693 when he does not appear on a census of the Swedes along the Delaware River, where he had lived for nearly three decades.[23] Though he was from Holstein
Holstein
(now in Germany), his first wife was a Finn and part of the Swedish community. Falkenberg settled on an 800-acre tract of land that he had acquired from the Lenni Lenape
Lenape
Native Americans in 1674, and a 1697 deed re-confirmed this earlier purchase. This tract included the two islands of Monhunk and Minnicunk later known as Osborn Island and Wills Island.[24] Falkenberg was a linguist, fluent in the Lenape language, and was considered southern New Jersey's foremost language interpreter involving land transactions between the Indians and the European settlers, particularly the English Quakers.[25] The Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Massacre took place in October 1778 during the American Revolutionary War, as British Army
British Army
Major Patrick Ferguson was wreaking havoc on Colonial shipping in the Mullica River. Kazimierz Pułaski and his newly raised forces were ordered to oppose his actions. Pulaski's Legion, along with three companies of light infantry, three troops of light horse, and one artillery detachment, came too late to be of great use against Ferguson's operations. But their arrival did stop Ferguson from raiding the iron works at Batsto, and stemmed their attacks on privateers at The Forks of the Mullica River. They then set up camp on a farm. A deserter, Lt. Gustav Juliet, found Ferguson and told him of Pulaski's encampment; he mentioned that morale was fairly low, and security almost nonexistent, so that a surprise attack would be devastating. Ferguson promptly loaded 250 of his best men onto boats and rowed them, in the dark, some 10 miles (16 km) to Osborne Island. He then marched them a further 2 miles (3.2 km) to the site of the infantry outpost, which comprised 50 men a short distance from the main encampment. At first light, Ferguson ordered the attack; only five of his quarry were taken alive. Pulaski eventually led his mounted troops up, causing Ferguson to retreat to his boats minus a few men that had fallen into the colonists' hands. A memorial on Radio Road commemorates the attack.[26] Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township was formed on February 13, 1740, as Egg Harbour Township from portions of Northampton Township (now Mount Holly Township), while the area was still part of Burlington County. It was incorporated as one of New Jersey's 104 in the Township Act of 1798 by an act of the New Jersey
New Jersey
Legislature on February 21, 1798. While in Burlington County, portions of the township were taken to form Washington Township (November 19, 1802) and Bass River Township (March 30, 1864). Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township became part of Ocean County on March 30, 1891, after which further portions of the township were ceded to create Long Beach Township (March 23, 1899) and Tuckerton (February 18, 1901).[27] Tuckerton Wireless Tower[edit] The Tuckerton Wireless Tower (39°33′31″N 74°22′14″W / 39.5585°N 74.3706°W / 39.5585; -74.3706), at 825 feet (251 m) in height, was built in 1912[28][29] by the German "Hochfrequenzmaschinen Aktiengesellschaft Für Drahtlose Telegraphie" company (The High Frequency Machine Corporation for Wireless Telegraphy, often referred to as HOMAG) when the present-day Mystic Island was called Hickory Island. The tower was used to communicate with an identical radio telegraph station in Eilvese, Germany starting on Jun 19, 1914, less than two weeks before the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand. The station continued to communicate with Eilvese [30] until America entered World War I on April 6, 1917.[31] It is rumored that it was used to send the message to order the attack by a German U-boat
U-boat
on the RMS Lusitania. After President Wilson's Declaration of Neutrality, the President's Executive Order 2042[32] required the US Navy to take over the station on September 9, 1914, to assure the neutrality of messages sent to and from the station.[33] However, the station continued to be operated by German nationals employed by HOMAG and continued to communicate only with the Eilvese radio station.[34] When America entered the war, all U.S. radio stations were seized and shut down by Executive Order 2605A on April 30, 1917.[35] The remaining German personnel at Tuckerton immediately became war prisoners and were replaced by U.S. Navy personnel. The Navy used the Tuckerton Radio Station for transatlantic communications while the naval radio stations in New Brunswick, New Jersey
New Jersey
and Sayville, New York were undergoing major transmitter and antenna upgrades. Tuckerton was used for fleet broadcasts after installations of 200 kilowatt transmitters at New Brunswick and Sayville were completed in June 1918. After the war, the Tuckerton Wireless Station was included in German war reparations paid to America. Shortly afterwards, it was sold to RCA
RCA
which operated it until 1948 as a backup to their famous Radio Central facility in Rocky Point, New York.[31] In 1921, RCA
RCA
installed two massive Alexanderson alternators, which were removed in 1948. For transatlantic communications, the radio station operated under the call signs WCI and WGG. For coastal communications, after World War I, the station operated under the callsign WSC. The 820-foot (250 m) steel tower, anchored by three large concrete blocks, was taken down on December 27, 1955.[36] The three huge anchor blocks still exist today, in a backyard on North Ensign Drive and in the middle of South Ensign Drive and Staysail Drive. Many smaller anchor blocks providing foundations for smaller towers that supported the umbrella antenna are still visible in the lagoons. Remains of the large tower can be seen in scraps at the Giffordtown Museum.[37] Later history[edit] While the township was formed in the 1700s, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
remained predominantly rural and undeveloped well into the late 20th century. It wasn't until the late 1950s until any major development was started. During this time, the construction of manufactured waterfront bungalows on lagoons were built and marketed as vacation properties, most notably Mystic Islands, Holly Lake Harbor, as well as Atlantis; the latter of which a "research home" was constructed to test hundreds of components and finishing materials for possible inclusion in model homes.[38] Most of the population were seasonal residents from either New York, Philadelphia, or other parts of New Jersey. Several developments were constructed in the decades following around the Mystic Islands area, mostly consisting of townhomes, duplex, and small single-family homes meant to act as either vacation homes or year-round residence. In 1979, Pinelands Regional High School
Pinelands Regional High School
opened in the growing township, serving students from Little Egg Harbor, Tuckerton, Bass River, and Eagleswood; those students formerly went to Southern Regional High School in Manahawkin.[39] It wasn't until the 2000s when the population of the township boomed. The town was one of the fastest-growing in Ocean County, next to Barnegat.[40] The formerly sparsely-developed Radio Road, Mathistown Road, and Center Street were the sites of several new housing developments, shopping centers, and offices. While 75% of the growth came from new retirement communities, the former resort town dubbed "Little Treasure on the Bay" saw an influx of year-round residents and families, having become more of a suburb.[41] Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township made national headlines after the November 3, 2004, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Intermediate School Bombing when a fighter jet on a training mission from the 113th Wing of the District of Columbia Air National Guard, based at Andrews Air Force Base
Andrews Air Force Base
in Maryland, shot seven bullets into the Intermediate School's roof, and many others into the parking lot. Only a few custodians were in the school, and nobody was injured. The plane had been on a training mission at the Warren Grove Gunnery Range, a 2,400-acre (10 km2) area about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) from the school. The school was repaired during the New Jersey
New Jersey
Teachers' Convention, using $519,000 paid by the Air Force to the school district.[42] On the morning of August 28, 2011, Tropical Storm Irene made its second U.S. landfall in Brigantine, though initial reports placed it at the Little Egg Inlet on the border with Galloway Township. At the time it was believed to be the first hurricane to make landfall in New Jersey since 1903,[43] but later analysis by the National Hurricane Center determined that the storm had weakened to tropical storm status by the time it made its second landfall.[44] On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy
Hurricane Sandy
caused widespread damage and flooding to the township, damaging roughly 4,000 homes, especially in the Mystic Island section.[45] On the one-year anniversary of the storm, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie
Chris Christie
visited the township's Community Center to celebrate both the reopening of the storm-damaged building as well as the recovery efforts from the storm.[46] Geography[edit] According to the United States
United States
Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 73.053 square miles (189.206 km2), including 47.368 square miles (122.682 km2) of land and 25.685 square miles (66.524 km2) of water (35.16%).[1][2] Mystic Island (2010 Census population of 8,493[47]) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located in the southern part of the township.[48][49][50] Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Atlantis, Edge Cove, Giffordtown, Jessies Point, Nugentown, Parkertown, Storm Island, Tucker Beach and West Tuckerton.[51] The township borders the Ocean County municipalities of Barnegat Township, Beach Haven, Eagleswood Township, Long Beach Township and Stafford Township; Galloway Township in Atlantic County; and both Bass River Township and Woodland Township in Burlington County.[52] Little Egg Harbor completely surrounds the independent municipality of Tuckerton, which became independent when it was incorporated in 1901.[27] Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
and Tuckerton share the same ZIP code. Demographics[edit]

Historical population

Census Pop.

1800 1,160

1810 913

−21.3%

1820 1,102

20.7%

1830 1,491

35.3%

1840 1,875

25.8%

1850 2,020

7.7%

1860 2,375

17.6%

1870 1,779

−25.1%

1880 1,881

5.7%

1890 1,771

−5.8%

1900 1,856 * 4.8%

1910 388 * −79.1%

1920 410

5.7%

1930 547

33.4%

1940 577

5.5%

1950 644

11.6%

1960 847

31.5%

1970 2,972

250.9%

1980 8,483

185.4%

1990 13,333

57.2%

2000 15,945

19.6%

2010 20,065

25.8%

Est. 2016 20,818 [13][53] 3.8%

Population sources: 1800-1890[54] 1850-2000[55] 1800-1920[56] 1850-1870[57] 1850[58] 1870[59] 1880-1890[60] 1890-1910[61] 1910-1930[62] 1930-1990[63] 2000[64][65] 2010[10][11][12] * = Lost territory in previous decade.[27]

Census 2010[edit] As of the 2010 United States
United States
Census, there were 20,065 people, 8,060 households, and 5,674 families residing in the township. The population density was 423.6 per square mile (163.6/km2). There were 10,324 housing units at an average density of 218.0 per square mile (84.2/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.19% (18,899) White, 1.35% (271) Black or African American, 0.16% (33) Native American, 1.24% (249) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 1.51% (303) from other races, and 1.54% (308) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.22% (1,047) of the population.[10] There were 8,060 households out of which 25.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.5% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.6% were non-families. 24.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.90.[10] In the township, the population was spread out with 20.4% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 22.3% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 21.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.4 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 89.8 males.[10] The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey
American Community Survey
showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $59,365 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,765) and the median family income was $66,345 (+/- $4,466). Males had a median income of $56,279 (+/- $3,204) versus $42,683 (+/- $3,850) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,566 (+/- $1,778). About 6.5% of families and 8.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.9% of those under age 18 and 4.7% of those age 65 or over.[66] Census 2000[edit] As of the 2000 United States
United States
Census[17] there were 15,945 people, 6,179 households, and 4,442 families residing in the township. The population density was 324.7 people per square mile (125.4/km²). There were 7,931 housing units at an average density of 161.5 per square mile (62.4/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.22% White, 0.79% African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.60% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.98% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.26% of the population.[64][65] There were 6,179 households out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.8% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.1% were non-families. 22.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.98.[64][65] In the township the population was spread out with 24.2% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 23.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.[64][65] The median income for a household in the township was $45,628, and the median income for a family was $51,580. Males had a median income of $39,668 versus $29,576 for females. The per capita income for the township was $20,619. About 4.1% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.4% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.[64][65] Government[edit]

The Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Administrative Justice Complex opened in 2004

Local government[edit] Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
operates under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government. The five-member Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7][67] Annually, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor, and another as Deputy Mayor, each serving one-year terms.[68] As of 2016[update], the members of the Township Committee are Mayor Eugene "Gene" Kobryn (R, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2016), Deputy Mayor
Mayor
David Schlick (D, term on committee ends 2018; term as deputy mayor ends 2016), Ray Gormley (R, 2017), John Kehm Jr. (R, 2017) and Lisa Stevens (D, 2018).[3][69][70][71][72][73][74] Emergency services[edit] Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township is served by Great Bay Regional Volunteer EMS, which also provides primary 911 emergency medical services for the residents of Bass River Township and Eagleswood Township.[75] Federal, state and county representation[edit] Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[76] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[11][77][78] Prior to the 2010 Census, Little Egg Harbor Township had been part of the 3rd Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey
New Jersey
Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[79] New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[80] New Jersey
New Jersey
is represented in the United States
United States
Senate by Democrats Cory Booker
Cory Booker
(Newark, term ends 2021)[81] and Bob Menendez
Bob Menendez
(Paramus, 2019).[82][83] For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 9th Legislative District of the New Jersey
New Jersey
Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township).[84][85] The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy
Phil Murphy
(D, Middletown Township).[86] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey
New Jersey
is Sheila Oliver
Sheila Oliver
(D, East Orange).[87] Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[88] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2015[update], Ocean County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and department directorship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (R, term ends December 31, 2015, Pine Beach; Finance, Parks and Recreation),[89] Freeholder Deputy Director Gerry P. Little (R, 2015, Surf City; Human Services),[90] John P. Kelly (R, 2016, Eagleswood Township; Law and Public Safety),[91] James F. Lacey (R, 2016, Brick Township; Transportation)[92] and Joseph H. Vicari (R, 2017, Toms River; Senior Services and County Operations).[93][94][95] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light),[96][97] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River)[98] and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).[99][100] Politics[edit] As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 13,562 registered voters in Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township, of which 2,641 (19.5%) were registered as Democrats, 3,963 (29.2%) were registered as Republicans and 6,951 (51.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered to other parties.[101] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 67.6% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 84.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[101][102] In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney
Mitt Romney
received 57.0% of the vote (5,129 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama
Barack Obama
with 42.0% (3,777 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (97 votes), among the 9,060 ballots cast by the township's 14,200 registered voters (57 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 63.8%.[103][104] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain
John McCain
received 56.5% of the vote (5,577 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama
Barack Obama
with 41.6% (4,108 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (117 votes), among the 9,879 ballots cast by the township's 14,042 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.4%.[105] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 58.9% of the vote (5,046 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry
John Kerry
with 40.0% (3,430 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (71 votes), among the 8,571 ballots cast by the township's 12,064 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 71.0.[106] In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie
Chris Christie
received 74.6% of the vote (4,603 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono
Barbara Buono
with 23.5% (1,449 votes), and other candidates with 2.0% (122 votes), among the 6,322 ballots cast by the township's 13,898 registered voters (148 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 45.5%.[107][108] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie
Chris Christie
received 63.0% of the vote (4,198 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine
Jon Corzine
with 28.9% (1,926 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.5% (364 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (91 votes), among the 6,666 ballots cast by the township's 13,690 registered voters, yielding a 48.7% turnout.[109] Education[edit] Students in public school for grades pre-kindergarten through sixth grade attend the schools of the Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its three schools had an enrollment of 2,831 students and 159.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 17.8:1.[110] Schools in the district (with 2014-15 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics.[111]) are Robert C. Wood Sr. Early Childhood Center[112] (271 students in PreK; preschool opened for the 2012-13 school year), Frog Pond Elementary School[113] for grades K to 6 (610 students) and George J. Mitchell Elementary School[114] for pre-K through sixth grade (727 students).[115][116] Public school students in seventh through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Pinelands Regional School District, which also serves students from Bass River Township, Eagleswood Township and Tuckerton Borough.[117][118][119] The township has six members serving on the district's nine-member Board of Education.[120] Schools in the district (with 2014-15 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[121]) are Pinelands Regional Junior High School[122] with 802 students in grades 7-9 and Pinelands Regional High School[123] with 815 students in grades 10-12.[124][125][126] Transportation[edit] Roads and highways[edit] As of May 2010[update], the township had a total of 128.34 miles (206.54 km) of roadways, of which 86.31 miles (138.90 km) were maintained by the municipality, 34.55 miles (55.60 km) by Ocean County, 3.47 miles (5.58 km) by the New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Transportation and 4.01 miles (6.45 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[127] The Garden State Parkway
Garden State Parkway
passes through the township, connecting Bass River Township in Burlington County in the south to Eagleswood Township in the north[128] and includes interchange 58, which is signed for County Route 539 serving Tuckerton / Trenton.[129] County Route 539 and Route 9 are major arteries in the township. Public transportation[edit] NJ Transit
NJ Transit
provides bus service between the township and Atlantic City on the 559 route.[130] Ocean Ride local service is provided on the OC6 Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
- Stafford Township route.[131][132][133] Notable people[edit] See also: Category:People from Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township, New Jersey. People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township include:

Gaten Matarazzo
Gaten Matarazzo
(born 2002), star of the Netflix
Netflix
original series Stranger Things.[134] Lily McBeth (born 1934), transgender substitute teacher at the town's local schools who made national news after she underwent a sex-change operation.[135] Jacklyn Pezzotta, winner of the Miss New Jersey
New Jersey
Teen USA pageant in 2003.[136] Brian E. Rumpf (born 1964), member of the New Jersey
New Jersey
General Assembly since 2003, who also served on the Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township Committee, serving as the township's mayor from 2000 to 2003.[137]

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey
New Jersey
County Subdivisions, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014. ^ a b Mayor
Mayor
and Committee, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township. Accessed July 26, 2016. ^ 2017 New Jersey
New Jersey
Mayors Directory, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 30, 2017. ^ Administration Department, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township. Accessed July 26, 2016. ^ Township Clerk, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township. Accessed July 26, 2016. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey
New Jersey
Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 49. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Little Egg Harbor, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013. ^ "2010 Census Populations: Ocean County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed September 12, 2011. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of State, p. 5. Accessed January 6, 2013. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
township, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File
File
1 for New Jersey, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Little Egg Harbor, NJ, United States
United States
Postal Service. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Little Egg Harbor, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 16, 2013. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States
United States
Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Community Profile, Ocean County Library. Accessed October 6, 2007. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey
New Jersey
Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 3, 2015. ^ Craig, Peter S. "Sinnick Broer the Finn and his Sinex, Sinnickson & Falkenberg Descendants", Swedish Colonial News, Volume 2, Number 7, Fall 2002. Accessed September 3, 2015. ^ Blackman, Leah (1880). History of Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township, Burlington County, New Jersey. privately published. Retrieved October 21, 2010.  ^ Craig, Peter Stebbins. 1671 Census of the Delaware, p. 71. Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 1999. ISBN 9781887099103. Accessed September 3, 2015. ^ Weaver, Donna. "Ceremony remembers massacre of Count Pulaski's troops by the British in Little Egg Harbor", The Press of Atlantic City, October 9, 2011. Accessed September 16, 2013. "A small crowd of residents and historical enthusiasts gathered at the Pulaski Monument at Pulaski and Radio roads Sunday afternoon to remember the massacre of 50 of Count Kazimierz Pulaski's troops in a surprise attack by more than 200 British troops 233 years ago this week during the Revolutionary War." ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 203. Accessed September 3, 2015. ^ Tuckerton Wireless Tower Archived 2015-02-18 at the Wayback Machine., Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Regional School District. Accessed September 16, 2013. ^ Staff. "TUCKERTON STATION CLAIMED BY FRENCH; Paris Company Contends Germans Agreed to Sell It the Wireless Plant. WANTS ALL PATENT RIGHTS Petition Filed in New Jersey
New Jersey
Court to Enforce Alleged Agreement and Get Tolls.", The New York Times, January 16, 1915. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ "Goldschmidt Transatlantic Radio Station, John L Hogan Jr, Electrical World, October 31, 1914 ^ a b Historic Monument - Telegraph Tower, Tuckerton Archived 2007-09-27 at the Wayback Machine., Stockton University
Stockton University
Art & Architecture of New Jersey. Accessed September 16, 2013. ^ Executive Order 2042 - Taking Over High-Power Radio Station for Use of the Government, September 5, 1914, American Presidency Project. Accessed September 16, 2013. ^ The United States
United States
Navy and the Control of Radio Frequencies, World War I Document Archive. Accessed September 16, 2013. ^ Howeth, Capt. Linwood S. "Operations and Organization of United States Naval Radio Service During Neutrality Period", from History of Communications-Electronics in the United States
United States
Navy, 1963. Accessed March 5, 2018. ^ Executive Order 2605A - Taking Over Necessary and Closing Unnecessary Radio Stations, April 30, 1917, American Presidency Project. Accessed September 16, 2013. ^ Tuckerton Community Profile, Ocean County Library. Accessed April 2, 2007. "Just prior to World War I, the German government built the Tuckerton Wireless, a 680 feet (207 m) tall tower with the capability of communicating directly with Europe. The tower was operated by German nationals until the entrance of the United States into the war. Local folklore maintains that the message "Get the Lucy" was broadcast from the tower, which resulted in the famous sinking of the Lusitania. The tower was dismantled in 1955." ^ Museum Exhibits, Tuckerton Historical Society. Accessed September 16, 2013. ^ Friedman, Charles. "Builder Puts Products to Test At New Jersey Research House", The New York Times, July 24, 1966. Accessed January 24, 2015. ^ The History of SRHS..., Southern Regional School District. Accessed January 24, 2015. "But eventually the high school had to go into split sessions due to over-crowding again. That problem was finally solved in 1979 with the opening of Pinelands Regional High School
Pinelands Regional High School
in Tuckerton. All mainland students south of Manahawkin would no longer be attending Southern Regional." ^ Jordan, Bob. "Suburban sprawl continues at shore", Asbury Park Press, July 10, 2001. Accessed January 24, 2015. ^ Spahr, Rob. "Barnegat Township expected to bear burden of growth as Ocean County population continues to boom, officials say", The Press of Atlantic City, October 31, 2010. Accessed January 24, 2015. "Little Egg Harbor Township was once dubbed by Assemblyman Brian Rumpf, R-Ocean, Burlington, Atlantic, as 'The Little Hidden Treasure by the Bay.' ... The township's population skyrocketed from a mere 847 in 1960 to 26,818 in 2009, which represents a more than 3,000 percent increase." ^ Spahr, Rob. "Little Egg school shot by jet to get $519,000", The Press of Atlantic City, November 2, 2006. Accessed September 29, 2014. "Superintendent of Schools Frank Kasyan, along with Assemblyman Brian Rumpf, announced Wednesday that after a lengthy tort-claims process, the Air Force has agreed to pay the school board more than $500,000." ^ Staff. " Hurricane Irene
Hurricane Irene
makes landfall in New Jersey; storm should be gone by mid-afternoon, meteorologist predicts - UPDATE", The Express-Times, August 28, 2011. Accessed September 29, 2014. " Hurricane Irene
Hurricane Irene
made landfall at 5:35 this morning in Little Egg Inlet, near Atlantic City, according to Hackettstown-based WeatherWorks meteorologist Nick Troiano, with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph, 1 mile an hour above the level at which a hurricane is defined. It was 1903 the last time a hurricane -- also a category one storm -- Troiano said. It was also near Atlantic City." ^ Avila, Lixion A.; and Cangialosi, John. "Tropical Cyclone Report - Hurricane Irene", National Hurricane Center, December 14, 2011. Accessed January 24, 2015. "Irene then continued north-northeastward, just offshore of the Delmarva peninsula, and made another landfall very near Atlantic City, New Jersey, at Brigantine Island, at 0935 UTC 28 August. Although Irene's intensity at the New Jersey
New Jersey
landfall was 60 kt, winds of that strength were confined to the waters east of the track of the center." ^ Staff. "Shore residents live among lingering Sandy damage", NewsWorks, October 8, 2013. Accessed January 24, 2015. ^ Weaver, Donna. "Gov. Christie to visit Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township on Sandy anniversary", The Press of Atlantic City, October 25, 2013. Accessed September 29, 2014. "Exactly one year after Hurricane Sandy tore through the bayfront community of Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township, Gov. Chris Christie
Chris Christie
will visit this southern Ocean County community." ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Mystic Island CDP, New Jersey, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File
File
1 for Ocean County, New Jersey, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey
American Community Survey
Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States
United States
Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015. ^ Areas touching Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township, MapIt. Accessed June 1, 2015. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey
New Jersey
April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Ocean County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 19, 2013. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 264, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed December 27, 2012. " Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
township comprises the southeastern section of the county, and contained in 1870 a population of 1,779." ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 140. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States
United States
Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States
United States
Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Table 6. New Jersey
New Jersey
Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File
File
1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Little Egg Harbor township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015. ^ Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township form of Government Archived 2006-05-09 at the Wayback Machine., Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township. Accessed July 5, 2006. ^ 2016 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township. Accessed July 26, 2016. ^ 2016 Ocean County & Municipal Elected Officials, Ocean County, New Jersey
New Jersey
Clerk, updated February 22, 2016. Accessed July 26, 2016. ^ Township of Little Egg Harbor, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed July 26, 2016. ^ 2015 General Election Official Results November 3, 2015, Ocean County, New Jersey
New Jersey
Clerk, updated November 10, 2015. Accessed July 26, 2016. ^ General Election November 4, 2014, Ocean County, New Jersey
New Jersey
Clerk, updated November 12, 2014. Accessed July 26, 2016. ^ General Election November 5, 2013, Ocean County, New Jersey
New Jersey
Clerk, updated November 14, 2013. Accessed July 26, 2016. ^ Home Page, Great Bay Regional Volunteer EMS. Accessed June 13, 2016. " Great Bay Regional Volunteer EMS
Great Bay Regional Volunteer EMS
is committed to protecting the lives of Little Egg Harbor's, Bass River's, and Eagleswood's residents and visitors by providing the best possible emergency and medical response services." ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey
New Jersey
Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013. ^ 2017 New Jersey
New Jersey
Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 30, 2017. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey
New Jersey
Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013. ^ 2011 New Jersey
New Jersey
Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States
United States
House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012. ^ About Cory Booker, United States
United States
Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community." ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States
United States
Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert." ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I" ^ Legislative Roster 2018-2019 Session, New Jersey
New Jersey
Legislature. Accessed January 22, 2018. ^ District 9 Legislators, New Jersey
New Jersey
Legislature. Accessed January 22, 2018. ^ Governor Phil Murphy, State of New Jersey. Accessed January 16, 2018. ^ Lieutenant Governor Oliver, State of New Jersey. Accessed January 16, 2018. "Assemblywoman Oliver has resided in the City of East Orange for over 40 years." ^ Freeholder History, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ Freeholder Director John C. Bartlett Jr., Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ Freeholder John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ Freeholder James F. Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ Freeholder Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ County Directory, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ Biography of Scott M. Colabella, Office of the County Clerk. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ Sheriff Michael Mastronardy, Ocean County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ 2015 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File
File
1 for New Jersey, United States
United States
Census Bureau. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Ocean County" (PDF). New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.  ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Ocean County" (PDF). New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.  ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ "Governor - Ocean County" (PDF). New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.  ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Ocean County" (PDF). New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.  ^ 2009 Governor: Ocean County, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ District information for Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016. ^ School Data for the Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016. ^ Robert C. Wood Sr. Early Childhood Center, Little Egg Harbor Township School District. Accessed January 18, 2017. ^ Frog Pond Elementary School, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District. Accessed January 18, 2017. ^ George J. Mitchell Elementary School, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District. Accessed January 18, 2017. ^ Handbook / Calendar for Parents / Guardians for 2016-2017 School Year, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District. Accessed January 18, 2017. ^ New Jersey
New Jersey
School Directory for the Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016. ^ Pinelands Regional School District
Pinelands Regional School District
2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 1, 2016. "The Pinelands Regional School District is a limited-purpose regional school district located in southern Ocean County. The District consists of a Junior High School for grades 7-9, a High School for grades 10-12 and an Alternative High School for at-risk students in grades 9-12. The communities of Bass River, Eagleswood, Little Egg Harbor, and Tuckerton are served by the District with approximately 1,700 students in grades 7-12." ^ School Choice Pinelands Regional School District. Accessed January 18, 2017. " Pinelands Regional School District
Pinelands Regional School District
is comprised of a Junior High School and a High School. The District serves students in grades 7 through 12 living in the communities of: Bass River Township (Burlington County), Eagleswood Township, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township, Tuckerton Borough" ^ Staff. "Regional School Districts", Burlington County Times, April 26, 2015. Accessed June 1, 2016. "PINELANDS REGIONAL - Serves: Bass River in Burlington County; Eagleswood, Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
and Tuckerton in Ocean County" ^ Board of Education, Pinelands Regional School District. Accessed January 18, 2017. "The Board of Education is composed of nine citizens elected to serve terms of three years each. Representatives are elected on the basis of constituent population - one from Bass River Township, one from Eagleswood Township, six from Little Egg Harbor Township, and one from the Borough of Tuckerton." ^ School Data for the Pinelands Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016. ^ Junior High School, Pinelands Regional School District. Accessed January 18, 2017. ^ Senior High School, Pinelands Regional School District. Accessed January 18, 2017. ^ Contact Us, Pinelands Regional School District. Accessed January 18, 2017. ^ Living & Learning in Ocean County - Public Schools Directory 2016-2017, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 18, 2017. ^ New Jersey
New Jersey
School Directory for the Pinelands Regional School District, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016. ^ Ocean County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014. ^ Garden State Parkway
Garden State Parkway
Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Transportation, January 1997. Accessed September 29, 2014. ^ Travel Resources: Interchanges, Service Areas & Commuter Lots, New Jersey
New Jersey
Turnpike Authority. Accessed September 29, 2014. ^ Ocean County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive
Internet Archive
as of July 26, 2010. Accessed December 27, 2012. ^ Ocean County Bus Service, Greater Mercer TMA. Accessed August 10, 2015. ^ Ocean Ride Rider's Guide, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed August 10, 2015. ^ Ocean County Transit Guide, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed August 10, 2015. ^ Jackson, Vincent. " Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
teen's journey from Broadway To Netflix Gaten Matarazzo
Gaten Matarazzo
has a role in Netflix's Stranger Things", The Press of Atlantic City, July 12, 2016. Accessed September 4, 2016. "Gaten Matarazzo, of Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township, learned something about the world of Hollywood casting when he auditioned for a child's role in the new Netflix
Netflix
series Stranger Things." ^ Lee, Michelle. "Transgender teaching sub won't return", The Press of Atlantic City, July 23, 2009. Accessed September 12, 2011. "Lily McBeth, a substitute teacher from Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township, became a national symbol of acceptance for transgender Americans in 2006 when the Eagleswood and Pinelands Regional school districts kept her on the job despite protests from some parents." ^ 2008 Contestants, Miss New Jersey
New Jersey
USA. Accessed August 10, 2015. "Jacklyn Pezzotta, 22, Little Egg Hbr" ^ Assemblyman Rumpf's Legislative Website, New Jersey
New Jersey
Legislature. Accessed December 27, 2012.

External links[edit]

Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township website Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District's 2015–16 School Report Card from the New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Education School Data for the Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics Pinelands Regional School District Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Branch of Ocean County Library Sunset Over the Salt Meadows Pinelands-Pine Barrens photo galleries of native flora fauna and landscapes

v t e

Municipalities and communities of Ocean County, New Jersey, United States

County seat: Toms River

Boroughs

Barnegat Light Bay Head Beach Haven Beachwood Harvey Cedars Island Heights Lakehurst Lavallette Mantoloking Ocean Gate Pine Beach Point Pleasant Point Pleasant Beach Seaside Heights Seaside Park Ship Bottom South Toms River Surf City Tuckerton

Townships

Barnegat Berkeley Brick Eagleswood Jackson Lacey Lakewood Little Egg Harbor Long Beach Manchester Ocean Plumsted Stafford Toms River

CDPs

Barnegat Beach Haven West Cedar Glen Lakes Cedar Glen West Crestwood Village Dover Beaches North Dover Beaches South Forked River Holiday City-Berkeley Holiday City South Holiday Heights Lakewood Leisure Knoll Leisure Village Leisure Village East Leisure Village West Manahawkin Mystic Island New Egypt North Beach Haven Ocean Acres Pine Lake Park Pine Ridge at Crestwood Silver Ridge Toms River Vista Center Waretown

Other unincorporated communities

Adamston Archertown Barnegat Pines Bayville Bennetts Mills Breton Woods Brindletown Brookville Bullock Burrsville Cassville Cedar Beach Cedar Run Chadwick Beach Island Clarks Landing Gilford Park Glen Cove Harmony Herbertsville High Bar Harbor Holly Park Holmeson Howardsville Jackson Mills Lanoka Harbor Laurelton Leesville Loveladies Mayetta Nugentown Osbornsville Parkertown Parkway Pines Prospertown Ridgeway Silverton Warren Grove West Creek West Tuckerton Wheatland Whitesville Whiting

Ghost towns

Aserdaten Crossley

Places adjacent to Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township, New Jersey

Woodland Township Barnegat Township Stafford Township

Bass River Township

Little Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor
Township

Eagleswood Township

Galloway Township Long Beach Township