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Financial Times
Financial Times
and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award is an annual award given to the best business book of the year as determined by the Financial Times
Financial Times
and McKinsey & Company. It aims to find the book that has 'the most compelling and enjoyable insight into modern business issues'.[1] The award was established in 2005 and is worth £30,000. Beginning in 2010, five short-listed authors each receive £10,000, previously it was £5,000.[2] The award's principal partner was Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
from 2005–2013, when it was known as the " Financial Times
Financial Times
and Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Business Book of the Year Award". The principal partner became McKinsey & Company beginning in 2014. Since 2014, the Financial Times
Financial Times
and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award is presented at the same time as the Bracken Bower Prize for young business writers.[3]

Contents

1 Winners and shortlist 2 See also 3 Notes 4 External links

Winners and shortlist[edit] Blue Ribbon () = winner 2005[4][5] The shortlist was announced 20 September 2005,[6] and the winner announced 24 November 2005.[7]

John Battelle, The Search: How Google and Its Rivals Rewrote the Rules of Business and Transformed Our Culture Steven Levitt
Steven Levitt
and Stephen Dubner, Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything Thomas Friedman, The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century Constantinos C. Markides, Paul Geroski, Fast Second: How Smart Companies Bypass Radical Innovation to Enter and Dominate New Markets Pietra Rivoli, The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy: An Economist Examines the Markets, Power and Politics of World Trade James B. Stewart, DisneyWar

2006[8] The shortlist was announced 18 September 2006,[9] and the winner announced 27 October 2006.[10]

Chris Anderson, The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More Bo Burlingham, Small Giants: Companies that Choose to Be Great Instead of Big Charles Fishman, The Wal-Mart Effect: How the World's Most Powerful Company Really Works—and How It's Transforming the American Economy James Kynge, China Shakes The World: A Titan's Rise and Troubled Future – and the Challenge for America Marc Levinson, The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger

2007 The shortlist was announced 25 September 2007,[11] and the winner announced 25 October 2007.[12]

William D. Cohan, The Last Tycoons: The Secret History of Lazard Frères & Co. Alan Greenspan, The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World Philippe Legrain, Immigrants: Your Country Needs Them Nassim Nicholas Taleb, The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable Don Tapscott
Don Tapscott
and Anthony D Williams, Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything Iain Carson and Vijay Vaitheeswaran, ZOOM: The Global Race to Fuel the Car of the Future

2008 The shortlist was announced 18 September 2008 and the winner announced 14 October 2008.[13][14]

William J. Bernstein, A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World Tim Bouquet & Byron Ousey, Cold Steel: The Multi-billion-dollar Battle for a Global Industry Mohamed El-Erian, When Markets Collide: Investment Strategies for the Age of Global Economic Change Misha Glenny, McMafia: A Journey Through the Global Criminal Underworld Lawrence Lessig, Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy Alice Schroeder, The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life

2009[15] The longlist was announced 12 August 2009,[16] the shortlist announced around 18 September 2009,[17] and the winner announced 29 October 2009.[18]

Liaquat Ahamed, Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World Stephen Green, Good Value: Reflections on Money, Morality and an Uncertain World Nandan Nilekani, Imagining India: The Idea of a Renewed Nation Frank Partnoy, The Match King George Akerlof
George Akerlof
and Robert Shiller, Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why It Matters for Global Capitalism David Wessel, In Fed We Trust

2010[19] The longlist was announced 9 August 2010,[20] the shortlist was announced 16 September 2010,[21] and the winner announced 19 October 2010.[22]

Sheena Iyengar, The Art of Choosing David Kirkpatrick, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World Michael Lewis, The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine Sebastian Mallaby, More Money Than God: Hedge Funds and the Making of a New Elite Raghuram G. Rajan, Fault Lines: How Hidden Fractures Still Threaten the World Economy Andrew Ross Sorkin, Too Big to Fail: The Inside Story of How Wall Street and Washington Fought to Save the Financial System – and Themselves

2011[23] The longlist was announced on 9 August 2011,[24] the shortlist was announced on 14 September[25] and the winner was announced on 3 November 2011.[26]

Abhijit V. Banerjee
Abhijit V. Banerjee
and Esther Duflo, Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty Barry Eichengreen, Exorbitant Privilege: The Rise and Fall of the Dollar and the Future of the International Monetary System Edward Glaeser, Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier Margaret Heffernan, Willful Blindness: Why We Ignore the Obvious at Our Peril Richard Rumelt, Good Strategy Bad Strategy: The Difference and Why It Matters Daniel Yergin, The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World

2012[27][28] The shortlist was announced on 13 September 2012.[29] The winner was announced on 2 November 2012.[30][31]

Daron Acemoglu
Daron Acemoglu
and James A. Robinson, Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity and Poverty John M. Coates, The Hour Between Dog and Wolf: Risk-taking, Gut Feelings and the Biology of Boom and Bust Steve Coll, Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs: The Exclusive Biography Michael J. Sandel, What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits Of Markets William L. Silber, Volcker: The Triumph of Persistence

2013 The longlist was announced in August 2013.[32] The shortlist was announced on 18 September 2013.[33] The winner was announced on 18 November 2013.[34]

Neil Irwin, The Alchemists: Inside the Secret World of Central Bankers Iain Martin, Making it Happen: Fred Goodwin, RBS and the Men Who Blew Up the British Economy Viktor Mayer-Schönberger
Viktor Mayer-Schönberger
and Kenneth Cukier, Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think Anita Raghavan, The Billionaire's Apprentice: The Rise of The Indian-American Elite and The Fall of The Galleon Hedge Fund Sheryl Sandberg, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead Brad Stone, The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon

2014 The longlist was announced 6 August 2014.[35] The shortlist was announced 24 September 2014.[36] The winner was announced 11 November 2014.[37]

Julia Angwin, Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance Erik Brynjolfsson
Erik Brynjolfsson
and Andrew McAfee, The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc. Overcoming the Unseen Forces that Stand in the Way of True Inspiration Nick Davies, Hack Attack: How the Truth Caught Up with Rupert Murdoch Atif Mian and Amir Sufi, House of Debt: How They (and You) Caused the Great Recession, and How We Can Prevent It from Happening Again Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century

2015 The longlist was announced 12 August.[38] The shortlist was announced 22 September.[39] The winner was announced 17 November.[40] The winner received £30,000, and £10,000 was awarded to each of the remaining shortlisted books.[39]

Martin Ford, The Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of Mass Unemployment Jacquie McNish and Sean Silcoff, Losing the Signal: The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of Blackberry Nathaniel Popper, Digital Gold: The Untold Story of Bitcoin Anne-Marie Slaughter, Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family Richard Thaler, Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioural Economics Stephen Witt, How Music Got Free: What Happens When an Entire Generation Commits the Same Crime?

2016 The longlist was announced 7 August.[41] The shortlist was announced 9 September.[42] The winner was announced 22 November.[43]

Iris Bohnet, What Works: Gender Equality by Design Duncan Clark, Alibaba: The House That Jack Ma Built Rana Foroohar, Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business Robert J. Gordon, The Rise and Fall of American Growth: The U.S. Standard of Living Since the Civil War Lynda Gratton
Lynda Gratton
and Andrew Scott, The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity Sebastian Mallaby, The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan

2017 The longlist was announced 13 August.[44] The shortlist was announced on 19 September.[45] The winner was announced 7 November.[46]

David Enrich, The Spider Network: The Wild Story of a Maths Genius, a Gang of Backstabbing Bankers, and One of the Greatest Scams in Financial History Amy Goldstein, Janesville: An American Story Andrew W. Lo, Adaptive Markets: Financial Evolution at the Speed of Thought Brian Merchant, The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone Ellen Pao, Reset: My Fight for Inclusion and Lasting Change Walter Scheidel, The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century

See also[edit]

McKinsey Award
McKinsey Award
for Best Article of the Year in The Harvard Business Review

Notes[edit]

^ "Why there is a need for this award". Financial Times. 10 April 2005. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ " Fault Lines
Fault Lines
Raghuram G. Rajan
Raghuram G. Rajan
wins the Financial Times
Financial Times
and Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Business Book of the Year Award 2010". Goldman Sachs. 27 October 2010. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ "The Bracken Bower Prize". Financial Times. Retrieved 30 December 2015.  ^ "FT launches business book award". MediaWeek. 11 April 2005. Retrieved 19 September 2012.  ^ "Friedman wins 'FT' award." Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly
28 November 2005: 5. Literature Resource Center. Web. 30 September 2012. ^ "Synopses of the short-listed books 2005". Financial Times. 20 September 2005. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ "Business Book of the Year 2005". Financial Times. 24 November 2005. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ James Pressley (27 October 2006). "Kynge's `China Shakes the World' Wins FT, Goldman Book Award". Bloomberg News. Retrieved 19 September 2012.  ^ "Award shortlist announced 2006". Financial Times. 18 September 2006. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ "Business Book of the Year 2006". Financial Times. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ "Shortlist revealed for Business Book Award 2007". Financial Times. 25 September 2007. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ "Business Book of the Year 2007". Financial Times. 25 October 2007. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ "Business Book of the Year 2008". Financial Times. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ Allen, K. (2008). "El-Erian wins with FT/Goldman Sachs." The Bookseller, (5354), 12. ^ Gloria McDonough-Taub (17 September 2009). "6 Finalists Announced for FT/ Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Business Book of the Year Award". CNBC. Retrieved 19 September 2012.  ^ "Longlist for FT business book of the year announced 2009". Financial Times. 12 August 2009. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ "The shortlist: Reading past and present financial runes". Financial Times. 17 September 2009. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ " Liaquat Ahamed wins the FT Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Business Book of the Year Award 2009". Financial Times. 29 October 2009. Retrieved 30 May 2009.  ^ Shira Ovide (28 October 2010). "The Best Business Book of 2010: 'Fault Lines'". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 19 September 2012.  ^ "Business Book Of The Year Award 2010: Longlist announced for the Financial Times
Financial Times
and Goldman Sachs". Financial Times. 9 August 2010. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ "Shortlist Announced for the Financial Times
Financial Times
and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award 2010". Financial Times. 16 September 2010. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ " Raghuram G. Rajan
Raghuram G. Rajan
wins the Financial Times
Financial Times
and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award 2010". Financial Times. 29 October 2010. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ Gloria McDonough-Taub (4 November 2011). ""Poor Economics" Wins the Financial Times
Financial Times
and Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Business Book of the Year Award 2011". CNBC. Retrieved 19 September 2012.  ^ "2011 longlist". Financial Times. 9 August 2011. Retrieved 20 May 2012.  ^ "2011 shortlist". Financial Times. 14 September 2011. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ Andrew Hill (3 November 2011). "'Poor Economics' takes business book prize". Financial Times. Retrieved 30 May 2012.  ^ "FT and Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
business book of the year longlist announced". Business & Leadership. 8 September 2012. Retrieved 19 September 2012.  ^ Gloria McDonough-Taub (18 September 2012). " Financial Times
Financial Times
and Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Announce Shortlist for Business Book of the Year". CNBC. Retrieved 19 September 2012.  ^ Andrew Hill. "Biographies and economics dominate". Financial Times. Retrieved 15 September 2012.  ^ Andrew Hill (2 November 2012). "Exxon study wins FT book award". The Financial Times. New York. Retrieved 4 November 2012.  ^ Laurie Muchnick (3 November 2012). " Steve Coll
Steve Coll
Wins FT/Goldman Prize for Exxon Mobil Study". Business Week. Retrieved 4 November 2012.  ^ Andrew Hill (7 August 2013). "Reading list that mixes low deeds and high hopes". Financial Times. Retrieved 21 September 2013.  ^ Andrew Hill (18 September 2013). "Finalists that are worthy of a bruising debate". Financial Times. Retrieved 21 September 2013.  ^ Andrew Hill (18 November 2013). "Account of Jeff Bezos and Amazon wins Business Book of the Year". The Financial Times. Retrieved 19 November 2013.  ^ Andrew Hill (6 August 2014). "From hacking to fracking, this year's cracking business titles". Financial Times. Retrieved 12 November 2014.  ^ Andrew Hill (24 September 2014). "Shortlist unveiled for FT and McKinsey Business Book of the Year". Financial Times. Retrieved 12 November 2014.  ^ Andrew Hill (11 November 2014). "Thomas Piketty's 'Capital' wins Business Book of the Year". Financial Times. Retrieved 12 November 2014.  ^ Andrew Hill (12 August 2015). "Business Book Award longlist: must-read titles of 2015". Financial Times. Retrieved September 24, 2015.  ^ a b "Business Book of the Year 2015 shortlist revealed". The Bookseller. 22 September 2015. Retrieved 24 September 2015.  ^ Katherine Cowdrey (November 18, 2015). "Oneworld's Ford wins FT McKinsey Business Book award". The Bookseller. Retrieved November 19, 2015.  ^ Andrew Hill (7 August 2016). "Business Book of the Year award 2016: longlist announced". Financial Times. Retrieved 9 September 2016.  ^ Natasha Onwuemezi (8 September 2016). "Bloomsbury has two on FT Business Book shortlist". The Bookseller. Retrieved 9 September 2016.  ^ "THE MAN WHO KNEW by Sebastian Mallaby
Sebastian Mallaby
wins the Financial Times
Financial Times
and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award 2016". Financial Times. Retrieved 2016-12-06.  ^ Andrew Hill (August 13, 2017). "Business Book of the Year 2017 — the longlist". Financial Times.  ^ "Business Book of the Year 2017 — the shortlist". Financial Times. 19 September 2017.  ^ "Place matters: Janesville: An American Story wins 2017 Business Book of the Year Award". McKinsey. 7 November 2017. Retrieved 10 November 2017. 

External links[edit]

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