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The Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
is the valley through which the Delaware
Delaware
River flows. By extension, this toponym is commonly used to refer to Greater Philadelphia
Philadelphia
or Philadelphia
Philadelphia
metropolitan area ("the [Lower] Delaware Valley
Valley
Metropolitan Area"), which straddles the Lower Delaware
Delaware
River just north of its estuary. The Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
Metropolitan Area is located at the southern part of the Northeast megalopolis
Northeast megalopolis
and as such, the Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
can be described as either a metropolitan statistical area (MSA), or as a broader combined statistical area (CSA). The Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
Metropolitan Area is composed of several counties in southeastern Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and southwestern New Jersey, one county in northern Delaware
Delaware
and one county in northeastern Maryland. The MSA has a population of over 6 million, while the CSA has a population of over 7.1 million (as of the 2010 Census Bureau count). Philadelphia, being the region's major commercial, cultural, and industrial center, wields a rather large sphere of influence that affects the counties that immediately surround it. Some of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley's most well-known contributions to human civilization involve the region's higher education and medical institutions. The Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
has been influential upon American history and industry. The region are leaders in higher education, biotechnology, medicine, tourism and many others. With a gross domestic product of $388 billion, Philadelphia
Philadelphia
ranks ninth among world cities and fourth in the nation.[3] The area has hosted many people and sites significant to American culture and history, particularly in the arts, where Philadelphia alone has more outdoor sculptures and murals than any other American city,[4] politics, including many influential people involved in politics such as Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
and Joe Biden, and the American Revolution. Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is famously known as "The Birthplace of America"[5] as the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were both drafted and signed there. On December 7, 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the Constitution, and has since promoted itself as "The First State".[6] The Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
was home to many other instrumental moments in the American Revolution, including the First and Second Continental Congress, the preservation of the Liberty Bell, the Battles of Germantown, Brandywine, and Red Bank, the Siege of Fort Mifflin, the winter of 1777–78 at Valley
Valley
Forge, the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Convention, and many others. Philadelphia
Philadelphia
was one of the nation's capitals in the Revolutionary War, and served as temporary U.S. capital while Washington, D.C., was under construction. Today, the area is home to some of the most prestigious universities in the world, such as the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University, Villanova University, Saint Joseph's University, and Temple University.[7] The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is consistently ranked as the best business school in the world.[8]

Contents

1 Geography 2 Population and economy

2.1 Subregions 2.2 List of counties 2.3 List of largest municipalities 2.4 Characteristics

3 Climate 4 Colonial history 5 Transportation

5.1 Commuter rail 5.2 Major highways 5.3 Airports

6 Colleges and universities

6.1 Delaware 6.2 New Jersey 6.3 Pennsylvania

7 Culture

7.1 Sports teams 7.2 Media

8 Area codes 9 Politics

9.1 Congressional districts

10 Lexicon note 11 See also 12 Notes 13 References 14 Further reading 15 External links

Geography[edit]

The drainage basin of the Delaware
Delaware
River.

In geology and geography, a strict sense of the term would incorporate the Delaware
Delaware
River's main drainage basin, and so encompass major tributaries such as the Schuylkill River
Schuylkill River
and Lehigh River
Lehigh River
and their valleys or sub-basins. These extensions also apply culturally with decreasing degree gradually decreased by proximal distance because the ease of land travel enables a great deal of daily interaction; for example, the large number of commuters who travel daily 45–90 minutes creates cultural blends and parallel values. In the course of their work, U.S. government agencies have reached various definitions of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
and the Greater Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Area. The Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) serves Philadelphia, four suburban Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
counties (Bucks County, Chester County, Delaware
Delaware
County, and Montgomery County), and four New Jersey
New Jersey
counties (Burlington County, Camden County, Gloucester County, and Mercer County).[9] The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines metropolitan statistical area (MSAs), which are regions with relatively high population densities at their cores and close economic ties throughout their respective areas. Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is located in the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of the counties served by the DVRPC except for Mercer County, and also includes New Castle County, Delaware, Cecil County, Maryland, and Salem County, New Jersey. The OMB also groups one or more MSAs into larger combined statistical areas (CSAs), which reflect commuting patterns. MSAs and CSAs are not formal administrative divisions, but serve as useful tools for understanding the extent of metropolitan areas such as the Delaware
Delaware
Valley. The Philadelphia-Reading-Camden Combined Statistical Area includes all of the counties from the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Area, as well as Berks County, Pennsylvania, Kent County, Delaware, Atlantic County, New Jersey, Cape May County, New Jersey, and Cumberland County, New Jersey. Population and economy[edit] According to 2016 estimates from the United States
United States
Census Bureau, the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Area
Metropolitan Statistical Area
ranks as the seventh-largest MSA in the United States
United States
with 6,070,500 people.[10] According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington MSA had a gross domestic product of $431 billion, the ninth-largest among U.S. metropolitan areas.[11] 2016 Census Bureau estimates rank the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden Combined Statistical Area
Combined Statistical Area
as the ninth-largest CSA in the United States, with 7,179,357 people.[12] The Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Area's population of roughly 6 million people is comparable to that of countries such as Lebanon, Denmark, and Nicaragua. The MSA's nominal gross domestic product of $431 billion is comparable to countries such as Belgium, Iran, and Thailand. The MSA also ranks as the second most populous in the Northeastern United States after the New York metropolitan area, while the CSA is third-largest in the Northeast after the New York and Boston metropolitan areas. The Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area, which is part of Northeast Megalopolis but is considered part of the Southeastern United States
United States
under Census Bureau definitions, is also larger than the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
metropolitan area. Philadelphia
Philadelphia
itself is the sixth-most populous city in the United States
United States
and the third-most populous U.S. city east of the Mississippi River, after New York City and Chicago. Philadelphia's media market ranks fourth, behind New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago, in Nielsen Media Market size rankings.[13] Such educational institutions as Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
Regional High School in Alexandria Township
Township
and Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
College in Doylestown Township
Township
are named after the region. Likewise, Frenchtown's now defunct newspaper The Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
News was another example of the usage. Subregions[edit] See also: Metropolitan Statistical Areas of New Jersey Sixteen counties in four states constitute the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden Combined Statistical Area. The five Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
counties in the MSA are collectively known as Southeastern Pennsylvania, and the four suburban counties from this region are sometimes called the "collar counties."[14] Aside from Philadelphia, major municipalities in Southeastern Pennsylvania include the inner suburbs of Upper Darby Township
Township
and Bensalem Township. Berks County, which forms its own MSA and contains the CSA's second largest city, Reading, is generally not considered to be part of Southeastern Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and is sometimes assigned to South Central Pennsylvania. The seven New Jersey
New Jersey
counties in the CSA form South Jersey, although Ocean County, which is part of the New York CSA, is also sometimes considered to be part of South Jersey.[15] Atlantic County, Cape May County, and Cumberland County each form their own respective metropolitan statistical areas. Atlantic City and the Jersey Shore
Jersey Shore
are major tourist destinations for people from inside and outside of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley. Other major municipalities in South Jersey
South Jersey
include Cherry Hill and Camden, which is across the Delaware
Delaware
River from Philadelphia. The two counties of Delaware
Delaware
in the CSA constitute a majority of Delaware's land mass and population. Wilmington is the most populous city in Delaware
Delaware
and the fifth-most populous municipality in the Delaware
Delaware
Valley. The lone Maryland
Maryland
county in the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden Combined Statistical Area
Combined Statistical Area
is part of the region known as the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Although Mercer County in Central Jersey
Central Jersey
is often considered part of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
from a cultural perspective, it is classified as part of New York's CSA by the OMB. Mercer County and two counties in Pennsylvania's Lehigh Valley, Lehigh County and Northampton County, are part of the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
media market. Caroline County, Maryland is also part of the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
media market.[16] List of counties[edit]

County State Seat 2010 Pop.[17] 2016 Pop.[17] Pop. Change Area[18] MSA[19] Map

Kent DE Dover 162,310 174,827 7.7% 279.4 mi2 Dover MSA

New Castle DE Wilmington 538,479 556,987 3.4% 426.3 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Cecil MD Elkton 101,108 102,603 1.5% 348.2 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Atlantic NJ Mays Landing 274,549 270,991 -1.3% 561.2 mi2 Atlantic City-Hammonton MSA

Burlington NJ Mount Holly 448,734 449,284 0.1% 804.8 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Camden NJ Camden 513,657 510,150 -0.7% 222.3 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Cape May NJ Cape May Court House 97,265 94,430 -2.9% 255.2 mi2 Ocean City MSA

Cumberland NJ Bridgeton 156,898 153,797 -2% 489.3 mi2 Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton MSA

Gloucester NJ Woodbury 288,288 292,330 1.4% 324.9 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Salem NJ Salem 66,083 63,436 -4% 337.8 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Berks PA Reading 411,442 414,812 0.8% 859.2 mi2 Reading MSA

Bucks PA Doylestown 625,249 626,399 0.2% 607.6 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Chester PA West Chester 498,886 516,312 3.5% 756 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Delaware PA Media 558,979 563,402 0.8% 184.2 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Montgomery PA Norristown 799,874 821,725 2.7% 781 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Philadelphia PA Philadelphia 1,526,006 1,576,872 3.3% 135.1 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA

Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA 5,965,343 6,070,500 1.8% 4928.2 mi2 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington MSA -

Philadelphia–Reading–Camden CSA 7,067,807 7,179,357 1.6% 7372.5 mi2 N/A -

List of largest municipalities[edit]

Ocean City, New Jersey

Wilmington, Delaware

See also: List of municipalities in Delaware, List of municipalities in Maryland, List of municipalities in New Jersey, and List of municipalities in Pennsylvania These municipalities are all within the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden Combined Statistical Area.

City Pop.[20] County State

Philadelphia 1,567,872 Philadelphia PA

Reading 87,575 Berks PA

Upper Darby Township 82,765 Delaware PA

Camden 74,420 Camden NJ

Wilmington 71,502 New Castle DE

Cherry Hill 70,976 Camden NJ

Gloucester Township 64,049 Camden NJ

Vineland 60,876 Cumberland NJ

Bensalem Township 60,354 Bucks PA

Lower Merion Township 58,220 Montgomery PA

Abington Township 55,640 Montgomery PA

Bristol Township 54,170 Bucks PA

Haverford Township 48,893 Delaware PA

Washington Township 48,301 Gloucester NJ

Evesham Township 45,578 Burlington NJ

Middletown Township 45,318 Bucks PA

Egg Harbor Township 43,747 Atlantic NJ

Mount Laurel 41,849 Burlington NJ

Northampton Township 39,562 Bucks PA

Winslow Township 39,417 Camden NJ

Characteristics[edit]

Grave of some of the 57 Irish victims of Duffy's Cut
Duffy's Cut
in West Laurel Hill Cemetery in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania. Irish Americans
Irish Americans
make up the largest ethnicity in the Delaware
Delaware
Valley.[21]

Philadelphia's Chinatown is home to many Chinese and other Asian restaurants.

West Chester, Pennsylvania

The Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
is home to extensive populations of Irish Americans, German Americans, English Americans, Ukrainian Americans, Italian Americans, Swedish-Americans
Swedish-Americans
(which have a museum located at FDR Park in South Philadelphia), Polish Americans, Scottish Americans, Scotch-Irish Americans, Greek Americans, African Americans, Asians such as Chinese, Indian, Korean and Vietnamese, Armenians, Arabs and Turks, and Pakistanis, Israelis
Israelis
(while American Jews
American Jews
form a significant ethno-religious community), Hispanics. Within the Hispanic population, the vast majority are Puerto Ricans, though other groups include Dominicans and Mexicans.[22] There is a significant West Indian community. There is even a small Native American community known as Lenapehoking
Lenapehoking
for Lenni- Lenape
Lenape
Indians of West Philadelphia. Philadelphia's suburbs contain a high concentration of malls, the two largest of which have at least 5,000,000 square feet (460,000 m2) of office space, and at least 600,000 square feet (56,000 m2) of retail. These are the King of Prussia Mall
King of Prussia Mall
in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, which is the largest in the United States
United States
(leasable sq. feet of retail space), and the Cherry Hill Mall
Cherry Hill Mall
in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, which was the first enclosed mall on the East Coast. Malls, office complexes, strip shopping plazas, expressways, and tract housing are common sights, and more and more continue to replace rolling countryside, farms, woods, and wetlands. However, due to strong opposition by residents and political officials, many acres of land have been preserved throughout the Delaware
Delaware
Valley. Older townships and large boroughs such as Cheltenham, Norristown, Jenkintown, Upper Darby and West Chester retain distinct community identities while engulfed in suburbia. The fastest-growing counties[when?] are Chester, Montgomery, Bucks, and Gloucester. Upper Darby, in Delaware
Delaware
County is the largest township in the United States.[citation needed] Sometimes Reading is included in the Delaware Valley
Valley
Metro Area.[citation needed] Mid-Atlantic American English and its subset, Philadelphia
Philadelphia
English, are two common dialects of American English
American English
in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and the Delaware
Delaware
Valley. Climate[edit] The Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
has four distinct seasons with ample precipitation and is divided by the 0 °C (32 °F) January isotherm. Most of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and the NJ portion, almost all of the DE and MD portions, part of Delaware
Delaware
County, and extreme southern portions of Bucks and Chester Counties have a humid subtropical climate (Cfa.) The remainder of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
has a hot-summer humid continental climate (Dfa.) Snow amounts may vary widely year-to-year and normally do vary widely within the Delaware
Delaware
Valley. The region has only two ski areas: Bear Creek Ski and Recreation Area
Bear Creek Ski and Recreation Area
in eastern Berks County and Spring Mountain in central Montgomery County. Using the -3 °C January isotherm as a boundary, all of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
is humid subtropical except for portions of Berks County and higher areas of northern Chester County. The warm-summer humid continental climate (Dfb) only exists in higher areas of Berks where all monthly temperatures average below 22 °C.

Climate data for Philadelphia
Philadelphia
( Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Airport), 1981–2010 normals,[a] extremes 1872–present[b]

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Record high °F (°C) 74 (23) 79 (26) 87 (31) 95 (35) 97 (36) 102 (39) 104 (40) 106 (41) 102 (39) 96 (36) 84 (29) 73 (23) 106 (41)

Mean maximum °F (°C) 62.0 (16.7) 62.7 (17.1) 73.6 (23.1) 83.2 (28.4) 89.1 (31.7) 94.2 (34.6) 96.4 (35.8) 94.7 (34.8) 89.8 (32.1) 81.7 (27.6) 72.3 (22.4) 63.5 (17.5) 97.5 (36.4)

Average high °F (°C) 40.3 (4.6) 43.8 (6.6) 52.7 (11.5) 63.9 (17.7) 73.8 (23.2) 82.7 (28.2) 87.1 (30.6) 85.3 (29.6) 78.0 (25.6) 66.6 (19.2) 56.0 (13.3) 44.8 (7.1) 64.6 (18.1)

Daily mean °F (°C) 33.0 (0.6) 35.7 (2.1) 43.5 (6.4) 54.0 (12.2) 63.9 (17.7) 73.3 (22.9) 78.1 (25.6) 76.6 (24.8) 69.1 (20.6) 57.5 (14.2) 47.6 (8.7) 37.5 (3.1) 55.9 (13.3)

Average low °F (°C) 25.6 (−3.6) 27.7 (−2.4) 34.4 (1.3) 44.1 (6.7) 54.0 (12.2) 63.8 (17.7) 69.2 (20.7) 67.9 (19.9) 60.3 (15.7) 48.4 (9.1) 39.2 (4) 30.1 (−1.1) 47.1 (8.4)

Mean minimum °F (°C) 8.7 (−12.9) 12.7 (−10.7) 19.4 (−7) 31.6 (−0.2) 42.0 (5.6) 52.2 (11.2) 59.8 (15.4) 57.8 (14.3) 47.2 (8.4) 35.8 (2.1) 26.0 (−3.3) 15.8 (−9) 6.4 (−14.2)

Record low °F (°C) −7 (−22) −11 (−24) 5 (−15) 14 (−10) 28 (−2) 44 (7) 51 (11) 44 (7) 35 (2) 25 (−4) 8 (−13) −5 (−21) −11 (−24)

Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.03 (77) 2.65 (67.3) 3.79 (96.3) 3.56 (90.4) 3.71 (94.2) 3.43 (87.1) 4.35 (110.5) 3.50 (88.9) 3.78 (96) 3.18 (80.8) 2.99 (75.9) 3.56 (90.4) 41.53 (1,054.9)

Average snowfall inches (cm) 6.5 (16.5) 8.8 (22.4) 2.9 (7.4) 0.5 (1.3) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0.3 (0.8) 3.4 (8.6) 22.4 (56.9)

Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 10.6 9.4 10.5 11.3 11.1 9.8 9.9 8.4 8.7 8.6 9.3 10.6 118.2

Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 4.4 3.6 1.8 0.4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.2 1.8 12.2

Average relative humidity (%) 66.2 63.6 61.7 60.4 65.4 67.8 69.6 70.4 71.6 70.8 68.4 67.7 67.0

Mean monthly sunshine hours 155.7 154.7 202.8 217.0 245.1 271.2 275.6 260.1 219.3 204.5 154.7 137.7 2,498.4

Percent possible sunshine 52 52 55 55 55 61 61 61 59 59 52 47 56

Source: NOAA (relative humidity and sun 1961–1990) [24][26][27]

Climate data for Atlantic City, New Jersey
New Jersey
(downtown), 1981–2010 normals,[c] extremes 1874–present[d]

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Record high °F (°C) 72 (22) 77 (25) 84 (29) 91 (33) 95 (35) 99 (37) 102 (39) 104 (40) 94 (34) 91 (33) 80 (27) 74 (23) 104 (40)

Mean maximum °F (°C) 59.3 (15.2) 59.9 (15.5) 68.4 (20.2) 77.3 (25.2) 83.7 (28.7) 89.7 (32.1) 93.5 (34.2) 91.8 (33.2) 86.3 (30.2) 78.9 (26.1) 70.1 (21.2) 62.4 (16.9) 95.3 (35.2)

Average high °F (°C) 41.8 (5.4) 43.5 (6.4) 49.6 (9.8) 57.6 (14.2) 66.6 (19.2) 75.7 (24.3) 81.3 (27.4) 80.2 (26.8) 74.8 (23.8) 65.0 (18.3) 55.8 (13.2) 46.3 (7.9) 61.6 (16.4)

Average low °F (°C) 29.2 (−1.6) 30.9 (−0.6) 36.9 (2.7) 45.5 (7.5) 54.5 (12.5) 64.3 (17.9) 70.0 (21.1) 69.7 (20.9) 63.5 (17.5) 52.5 (11.4) 42.9 (6.1) 33.5 (0.8) 49.5 (9.7)

Mean minimum °F (°C) 11.3 (−11.5) 16.3 (−8.7) 22.4 (−5.3) 33.8 (1) 44.3 (6.8) 53.7 (12.1) 61.4 (16.3) 60.1 (15.6) 50.5 (10.3) 39.2 (4) 29.0 (−1.7) 19.0 (−7.2) 10.1 (−12.2)

Record low °F (°C) −4 (−20) −9 (−23) 8 (−13) 15 (−9) 33 (1) 45 (7) 52 (11) 48 (9) 37 (3) 27 (−3) 10 (−12) −7 (−22) −9 (−23)

Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.08 (78.2) 2.87 (72.9) 4.02 (102.1) 3.39 (86.1) 3.22 (81.8) 2.68 (68.1) 3.31 (84.1) 3.92 (99.6) 3.08 (78.2) 3.47 (88.1) 3.35 (85.1) 3.62 (91.9) 40.01 (1,016.2)

Average snowfall inches (cm) 4.5 (11.4) 6.7 (17) 1.1 (2.8) 0.3 (0.8) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0.2 (0.5) 3.7 (9.4) 16.5 (41.9)

Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 9.3 9.0 10.5 10.9 10.4 8.7 8.4 8.0 7.7 7.6 8.9 10.4 109.8

Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 2.9 2.8 0.9 0.3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 1.7 8.7

Average relative humidity (%) 69.5 69.0 66.9 66.4 70.7 72.9 73.9 75.7 76.4 74.8 72.8 70.6 71.6

Mean monthly sunshine hours 150.8 157.9 204.5 218.9 243.9 266.2 276.3 271.3 227.6 200.5 147.4 133.8 2,499.1

Percent possible sunshine 50 53 55 55 55 60 61 64 61 58 49 46 56

Source: NOAA (relative humidity and sun 1961–1990 and snow at Atlantic City Int'l)[29][30][31][32]

Climate data for Doylestown, Pennsylvania

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Average high °F (°C) 39 (4) 43 (6) 52 (11) 63 (17) 74 (23) 82 (28) 87 (31) 85 (29) 77 (25) 66 (19) 55 (13) 44 (7) 63.9 (17.8)

Average low °F (°C) 24 (−4) 25 (−4) 33 (1) 42 (6) 52 (11) 61 (16) 66 (19) 65 (18) 57 (14) 45 (7) 37 (3) 29 (−2) 44.7 (7.1)

Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.94 (100.1) 2.87 (72.9) 4.24 (107.7) 3.85 (97.8) 4.81 (122.2) 3.61 (91.7) 4.72 (119.9) 4.34 (110.2) 4.66 (118.4) 3.35 (85.1) 3.74 (95) 3.80 (96.5) 47.93 (1,217.4)

Source: Weather Channel [33]

Climate data for Reading, Pennsylvania

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Record high °F (°C) 71 (22) 77 (25) 88 (31) 97 (36) 96 (36) 97 (36) 102 (39) 102 (39) 100 (38) 92 (33) 82 (28) 77 (25) 102 (39)

Average high °F (°C) 38 (3) 42 (6) 51 (11) 63 (17) 73 (23) 82 (28) 86 (30) 84 (29) 77 (25) 66 (19) 54 (12) 43 (6) 63.3 (17.4)

Average low °F (°C) 22 (−6) 24 (−4) 32 (0) 41 (5) 51 (11) 61 (16) 65 (18) 64 (18) 56 (13) 44 (7) 36 (2) 27 (−3) 43.6 (6.4)

Record low °F (°C) −20 (−29) −8 (−22) −2 (−19) 16 (−9) 26 (−3) 39 (4) 46 (8) 42 (6) 30 (−1) 20 (−7) 8 (−13) −4 (−20) −20 (−29)

Average precipitation inches (mm) 2.92 (74.2) 2.93 (74.4) 3.56 (90.4) 3.69 (93.7) 4.03 (102.4) 4.50 (114.3) 4.67 (118.6) 3.80 (96.5) 4.42 (112.3) 3.78 (96) 3.44 (87.4) 3.58 (90.9) 45.32 (1,151.1)

Source: The Weather Channel[34]

Climate data for Dover, Delaware
Delaware
(1981−2010 normals)

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Average high °F (°C) 43.4 (6.3) 47.0 (8.3) 54.9 (12.7) 65.7 (18.7) 74.7 (23.7) 83.2 (28.4) 87.0 (30.6) 85.2 (29.6) 79.3 (26.3) 68.8 (20.4) 58.5 (14.7) 47.4 (8.6) 66.3 (19.1)

Average low °F (°C) 27.1 (−2.7) 29.0 (−1.7) 35.6 (2) 44.3 (6.8) 53.8 (12.1) 63.4 (17.4) 68.4 (20.2) 67.0 (19.4) 60.1 (15.6) 48.7 (9.3) 39.8 (4.3) 31.0 (−0.6) 47.4 (8.6)

Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.41 (86.6) 3.07 (78) 4.31 (109.5) 3.88 (98.6) 4.25 (108) 4.00 (101.6) 4.09 (103.9) 4.36 (110.7) 4.13 (104.9) 3.42 (86.9) 3.48 (88.4) 3.65 (92.7) 46.05 (1,169.8)

Average snowfall inches (cm) 4.6 (11.7) 7.7 (19.6) .3 (0.8) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) .2 (0.5) 2.9 (7.4) 15.7 (40)

Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 10.1 9.6 10.0 11.3 10.9 9.1 9.3 8.6 8.3 8.0 7.9 10.3 113.4

Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 2.2 1.9 .3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .9 5.3

Source: NOAA[35]

Climate data for Wilmington, Delaware
Delaware
(New Castle Airport), 1981–2010 normals, extremes 1894–present

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Record high °F (°C) 75 (24) 78 (26) 86 (30) 97 (36) 98 (37) 102 (39) 103 (39) 107 (42) 100 (38) 94 (34) 85 (29) 75 (24) 107 (42)

Average high °F (°C) 40.2 (4.6) 43.5 (6.4) 52.4 (11.3) 63.5 (17.5) 73.0 (22.8) 81.8 (27.7) 86.1 (30.1) 84.2 (29) 77.4 (25.2) 66.2 (19) 55.7 (13.2) 44.6 (7) 64.1 (17.8)

Average low °F (°C) 24.6 (−4.1) 26.8 (−2.9) 33.6 (0.9) 43.0 (6.1) 52.6 (11.4) 62.6 (17) 67.6 (19.8) 66.1 (18.9) 58.2 (14.6) 46.1 (7.8) 37.4 (3) 28.7 (−1.8) 45.6 (7.6)

Record low °F (°C) −14 (−26) −15 (−26) 2 (−17) 11 (−12) 30 (−1) 40 (4) 48 (9) 43 (6) 32 (0) 23 (−5) 11 (−12) −7 (−22) −15 (−26)

Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.01 (76.5) 2.68 (68.1) 3.92 (99.6) 3.50 (88.9) 3.95 (100.3) 3.88 (98.6) 4.57 (116.1) 3.25 (82.6) 4.32 (109.7) 3.42 (86.9) 3.10 (78.7) 3.48 (88.4) 43.08 (1,094.2)

Average snowfall inches (cm) 5.9 (15) 8.3 (21.1) 1.9 (4.8) 0.3 (0.8) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0.4 (1) 3.4 (8.6) 20.2 (51.3)

Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 10.5 9.4 10.7 11.3 11.2 10.3 9.9 8.1 8.5 8.3 9.2 10.3 117.7

Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 4.3 3.6 1.3 0.4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.2 2.0 11.8

Source: NOAA[31][36]

Colonial history[edit] See also: Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
and History of Philadelphia The valley was the territory of the Susquehannock
Susquehannock
and Lenape, who are recalled in place names throughout the region. The region became part of the Dutch colony of New Netherland
New Netherland
after the exploration of Delaware
Delaware
Bay in 1609. The Dutch called the Delaware
Delaware
River the Zuyd Rivier, or South River, and considered the lands along it banks and those of its bay to be the southern flank of its province of New Netherland. In 1638, it began to be settled by Swedes, Forest Finns, Dutch, and Walloons and became the colony of New Sweden, though this was not officially recognized by the Dutch Empire
Dutch Empire
which re-asserted control in 1655. The area was taken by the English in 1664.[37] The name Delaware
Delaware
comes from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, who had arrived at Jamestown, Virginia
Jamestown, Virginia
in 1610, just as original settlers were about to abandon it, and thus maintaining the English foothold on the North American continent. Transportation[edit] Many residents commute to jobs in Philadelphia, Camden, and Wilmington with the help of expressways and trains. Commutes from one suburb to another are also common, as office parks have sprung up in new commercial centers such as King of Prussia, Fort Washington, Cherry Hill, and Plymouth Meeting. Commuter rail[edit] Formerly, the region was served by the Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
Railway.

Philadelphia's 30th St. Station has SEPTA Regional Rail
SEPTA Regional Rail
and Amtrak service

SEPTA Regional Rail

Airport Line connecting Central Philadelphia
Philadelphia
with Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and Delaware
Delaware
Counties. Wilmington/Newark Line
Wilmington/Newark Line
connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to the Wilmington, DE area (with limited weekday service to Newark, DE), via Chester City and Delaware
Delaware
County. Warminster Line
Warminster Line
connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
with southeastern Montgomery County and Warminster in Bucks County. West Trenton Line connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
north to the Trenton, NJ area, serving Montgomery and Bucks County, PA between Jenkintown, PA and Yardley, PA, with the final stop in Ewing, NJ. Media/Elwyn Line
Media/Elwyn Line
connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to central Delaware
Delaware
County. Paoli/Thorndale Line
Paoli/Thorndale Line
connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
with the affluent Main Line area and western Chester County near Coatesville. Lansdale/Doylestown Line connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
with Lansdale in central Montgomery County and Doylestown in Bucks County. Manayunk/Norristown Line
Manayunk/Norristown Line
connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
with Conshohocken and Norristown in Montgomery County. Cynwyd Line
Cynwyd Line
connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
with Bala Cynwyd on the Philadelphia/Montgomery County line (limited weekday service) Trenton Line connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to Trenton, NJ, serving Bucks County. Fox Chase Line
Fox Chase Line
connecting Central Philadelphia
Philadelphia
with the Fox Chase area in Philadelphia. Chestnut Hill East Line
Chestnut Hill East Line
and Chestnut Hill West Line
Chestnut Hill West Line
connecting Central Philadelphia
Philadelphia
with the Chestnut Hill area of the city.

New Jersey
New Jersey
Transit

Atlantic City Line
Atlantic City Line
connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to Atlantic City, NJ with connections to PATCO Speedline in Lindenwold, NJ. River Line connecting Camden (NJ) to Trenton (NJ) running along the east bank of the Delaware
Delaware
River.

MARC

Penn Line connecting Perryville, MD to Baltimore, MD
Baltimore, MD
and Washington D.C., and in the future will connect to SEPTA at Newark, DE.

PATCO Speedline connecting Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to Lindenwold, NJ in Camden County with connections to NJT's Atlantic City Line.

Major highways[edit]

Traffic heading into Philadelphia
Philadelphia
on Interstate 95.

Pennsylvania

I-76 (Schuylkill Expressway) I-78 / US 22 I-95 ( Delaware
Delaware
Expressway) I-176 I-76 / I-276 / Penna Turnpike I-476 (Blue Route) I-476 / Penna Turnpike NE Extension I-676 / US 30 (Vine Street Expressway) US 1 (Lincoln Expressway/Roosevelt Boulevard/City Line Avenue/Kennett-Oxford Bypass) US 13 US 30 (Lancaster Avenue/Lincoln Highway) US 202 (Wilmington Pike/Highway/Dekalb Pike/Highway/Doylestown Pike/Lower York Road) US 222 (Outer Bypass/Shillington Bypass) US 322 (Conchester Highway/Horseshoe Pike) US 422 (Pottstown Expressway/West Shore Bypass) PA 12 (Warren Street Bypass) PA 61 (Centre Avenue/Pottsville Pike) PA 63 (Woodhaven Road/Welsh Road/Sumneytown Pike) PA 100 (Pottstown Pike) PA 309 (Fort Washington Expressway/Bethlehem Pike/Sellersville-Souderton Bypass) PA 611 (Doylestown Bypass/Easton Road/Old York Road)

New Jersey

N.J. Turnpike G.S. Parkway A.C. Expressway I-76 I-295 I-676 (North-South Freeway) US 9 US 30 US 40 US 130 US 206 US 322 Route 38 Route 42 (North-South Freeway) Route 55 Route 70 Route 73 Route 90

Delaware

I-95 / Delaware
Delaware
Turnpike I-295 I-495 US 13 US 40 US 113 US 202 US 301 DE 1 DE 141

Maryland

I-95 US 1 US 40 US 222

Delaware
Delaware
River Bridges

Ben Franklin Bridge

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
International Airport

New Hope–Lambertville Bridge[38] Scudder Falls Bridge
Scudder Falls Bridge
(no toll) Delaware
Delaware
River – Turnpike Toll Bridge Burlington–Bristol Bridge Tacony–Palmyra Bridge Betsy Ross Bridge Ben Franklin Bridge Walt Whitman Bridge Commodore Barry Bridge Delaware
Delaware
Memorial Bridge

Airports[edit] Major:

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
International Airport (PHL), located 15 miles southwest of Center City Philadelphia, is the main international airport serving the immediate Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
Area Newark Liberty International Airport
Newark Liberty International Airport
(EWR), while not in the Delaware Valley, is a major airport serving certain regions of the Delaware Valley, including Bucks County
Bucks County
and New Jersey. It is located 60 miles northeast of Center City Philadelphia, and 25 miles northeast of Trenton.

Secondary:

Lehigh Valley
Valley
International Airport (ABE) Northeast Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Airport (PNE) New Castle Airport
New Castle Airport
(ILG) Reading Regional Airport
Reading Regional Airport
(RDG) Atlantic City International Airport
Atlantic City International Airport
(ACY)

Colleges and universities[edit]

Parrish Hall at Swarthmore College
Swarthmore College
and Cohen Hall, previously named Logan Hall, former home of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania; The Wharton School is consistently ranked as the best business school in the world[39]

Delaware[edit]

Delaware
Delaware
College of Art and Design Delaware
Delaware
State University Goldey-Beacom College University of Delaware Wesley College Widener University
Widener University
School of Law Wilmington University

New Jersey[edit]

Rider University Rowan University Rutgers School of Law–Camden Rutgers University (Camden) Stockton University The College of New Jersey

Pennsylvania[edit]

Albright College Alvernia University Arcadia University Bryn Mawr College Cabrini College Cairn University Chestnut Hill College Cheyney University of Pennsylvania Curtis Institute of Music Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
College DeVry University Drexel University Eastern University Gwynedd-Mercy College Harcum College Haverford College Holy Family University Immaculata University Kutztown University of Pennsylvania La Salle University Lincoln University Manor College Moore College of Art and Design Neumann University Peirce College Penn State Abington Penn State Berks Penn State Brandywine Penn State Great Valley Philadelphia
Philadelphia
College of Osteopathic Medicine Philadelphia
Philadelphia
University Rosemont College Saint Joseph's University Swarthmore College Temple University Thomas Jefferson University University of Pennsylvania University of the Arts (Philadelphia) University of the Sciences in Philadelphia Ursinus College Valley
Valley
Forge Christian College Valley
Valley
Forge Military Academy and College Villanova University West Chester University Westminster Theological Seminary Widener University

Culture[edit] Sports teams[edit] Further information: Sports in Philadelphia

Citizens Bank Park, home of the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Phillies

Listing of the professional sports teams in the Delaware
Delaware
Valley

National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
(NBA)

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
76ers

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB)

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Phillies

Minor League Baseball
Minor League Baseball
(MiLB)

Lakewood BlueClaws Reading Fightin Phils Wilmington Blue Rocks

National Football League
National Football League
(NFL)

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Eagles

National Hockey League
National Hockey League
(NHL)

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Flyers

Major League Soccer
Major League Soccer
(MLS)

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Union

Arena Football
Arena Football
(AFL)

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Soul

NBA G League

Delaware
Delaware
Blue Coats

Media[edit] Main article: Media in Philadelphia The two main newspapers are The Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Inquirer and the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Daily News, owned by the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Media Network. Local television channels include KYW-TV
KYW-TV
3 (CBS), WPVI
WPVI
6 (ABC), WCAU 10 (NBC), WHYY-TV
WHYY-TV
12 (PBS), WPHL-TV
WPHL-TV
17 (MyNetworkTV), WTXF
WTXF
29 (FOX), WPSG 57 (CW), and WPPX
WPPX
61 (Ion). Radio stations serving the area include: WRTI, WIOQ, WDAS (AM), and WTEL. Area codes[edit]

215/267: The City of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and some of its northern suburbs 610/484: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
outside Philadelphia, including the western suburbs, the Lehigh Valley, and most of Berks County 856: Southwestern New Jersey, including Camden, Cherry Hill, and Vineland 609: Central and Southeastern New Jersey, including Trenton, Atlantic City and the Jersey Shore 302: Delaware 410/443/667: Eastern half of Maryland, including Cecil County 717: South Central Pennsylvania, including Western Berks County

Politics[edit] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
itself is heavily Democratic, having voted for the Democratic candidate in every presidential election since 1936. The surrounding suburban counties are key political areas in Pennsylvania, which itself is an important swing state in federal politics.[40] South Jersey
South Jersey
has consistently voted Democratic at the presidential level in recent years, although the region is slightly more Republican-leaning than North Jersey
North Jersey
and has voted for Republicans at the state and local level.[41] New Castle County's Democratic lean and large share of Delaware's population has tended to make Delaware
Delaware
as a whole vote for Democrats, while the less populous Kent County is more competitive.[42] Recent well-known political figures from the Greater Philadelphia
Philadelphia
area include former Vice President Joe Biden
Joe Biden
and former Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Governor Ed Rendell. Congressional districts[edit] The following congressional districts of the United States
United States
House of Representatives are located partly or entirely in the Delaware
Delaware
Valley CSA. Italicized counties are not part of the CSA.

District Incumbent

District PVI Incumbent Party Counties

DE-AL 094 !D+6 Lisa Blunt Rochester D Kent, New Castle, and Sussex

MD-1 114 !R+14 Andy Harris R Cecil and several other counties

NJ-1 087 !D+13 Donald Norcross D Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester

NJ-2 101 !R+1 Frank LoBiondo R Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Ocean, and Salem

NJ-3 102 !R+2 Tom MacArthur R Burlington and Ocean

PA-1 069 !D+31 Bob Brady D Delaware
Delaware
and Philadelphia

PA-2 060 !D+40 Dwight Evans D Montgomery and Philadelphia

PA-6 102 !R+2 Ryan Costello R Berks, Chester, Lebanon, and Montgomery

PA-7 101 !R+1 Pat Meehan R Berks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, and Montgomery

PA-8 102 !R+2 Brian Fitzpatrick R Bucks and Montgomery

PA-13 085 !D+15 Brendan Boyle D Montgomery and Philadelphia

PA-15 104 !R+4 Charlie Dent R Berks, Dauphin, Lebanon, Lehigh, and Northampton

PA-16 105 !R+5 Lloyd Smucker R Berks, Chester, and Lancaster

Additionally, the Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
is represented in the United States Senate by the eight Senators from Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Lexicon note[edit] Some believe that the term " Delaware
Delaware
Valley" is not entirely a synonym for "Greater Philadelphia". "Greater Philadelphia" implies that the region is centered on the city in an economic and cultural context, while " Delaware
Delaware
Valley" is a more generic geographic term that does not imply that any part is of more consequence than any other. Several organizations, such as KYW Radio and the Greater Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Tourism Marketing Corporation, consciously use the term "Greater Philadelphia" to assert that Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the center of the region, referring to the less urbanized areas as "Philadelphia's countryside".[43] Others note that the customary media usage of the term omits the majority of the length of the Delaware
Delaware
River's valley that is not in metropolitan Philadelphia. WPVI-TV uses the slogan, "The Delaware
Delaware
Valley's leading news program" for their Action News
Action News
broadcast, since that program has led the ratings for news programs in the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
market for over 30 years. See also[edit]

Central Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
AVA Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
Railway Northeast megalopolis

Notes[edit]

^ Mean monthly maxima and minima (i.e. the highest and lowest temperature readings during an entire month or year) calculated based on data at said location from 1981 to 2010. ^ Official temperature and precipitation measurements for Philadelphia were taken at the Weather Bureau Office in downtown from January 1872 to 19 June 1940, and at Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Int'l from 20 June 1940 to the present.[23] Snowfall and snow depth records date to 1 January 1884 and 1 October 1948, respectively.[24] In 2006, snowfall measurements were moved to National Park, New Jersey
New Jersey
directly across the Delaware River from the airport.[25] ^ Mean monthly maxima and minima (i.e. the highest and lowest temperature readings during an entire month or year) calculated based on data at said location from 1981 to 2010. ^ The official climatology station for Atlantic City was at the Weather Bureau Office downtown from January 1874 to 15 June 1958 and Atlantic City Int'l (ACY) in Egg Harbor Township
Township
since 16 June 1958.[28] ACY's location in the Pine Barrens and distance away from the coast and urban heat island of downtown Atlantic City largely account for its markedly colder temperatures at night as compared to downtown; for example, from 1959 to 2013, there were 50 days with a low of 0 °F (−18 °C) or lower, while in the same period, the corresponding number of days at downtown was 2. The National Weather Service ceased regular snowfall observations at downtown after the winter of 1958–59.

References[edit]

^ "Welsh Mountain". Retrieved May 5, 2016.  ^ "MyTopo – Welsh Mountain area". Retrieved May 5, 2016.  ^ "Global city GDP rankings 2008–2025". Pricewaterhouse Coopers. Archived from the original on May 4, 2011. Retrieved November 20, 2009.  ^ Gateway to Public Art in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Archived August 10, 2011, at the Wayback Machine., Fairmount Park Art Association. ^ "Words and Their Stories: Nicknames for Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and Boston". Voice of America. Retrieved July 11, 2017.  ^ "The First to Ratify" would be more accurate, as the beginnings of the states themselves date back to the Declaration of Independence, celebrated July 4, 1776, when what was to become the State of Delaware was still the three lower counties of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
with the governor in Philadelphia, and not establishing independence from that body until September 20, 1776. According to Delaware's own website, " Delaware
Delaware
became a state in 1776, just two months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence." (ref-pdf) Therefore Delaware
Delaware
was actually the last of the thirteen colonies to establish itself as a state. Additionally, the Delaware
Delaware
State Quarter is minted with this nickname, yet shows Caesar Rodney on horseback in commemoration of how he was the last delegate to show up to the Continental Congress
Continental Congress
for the historic vote for independence. And with regard to the original Articles of Confederation, Delaware
Delaware
was the 12th of the 13 states to ratify. ^ Tucker, Laura (November 25, 2014). "Philadelphia". QS Quacquarelli Symonds Limited. Retrieved October 11, 2015.  ^ "The 50 best business schools in the world".  ^ "Greater Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Economic Development Framework" (PDF). September 2009. Retrieved 5 January 2018.  ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016". United States
United States
Census Bureau. Retrieved December 30, 2017.  ^ Analysis, US Department of Commerce, BEA, Bureau of Economic. "Bureau of Economic Analysis". www.bea.gov. Retrieved 2017-10-04.  ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - United States
United States
-- Combined Statistical Area; and for Puerto Rico". United States
United States
Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2017. Retrieved April 20, 2016.  ^ "Local Television Market Universe Estimates" (PDF). Nielsen. The Nielsen Company. 24 September 2016. Retrieved 11 April 2017.  ^ Bond, Michaelle (7 November 2017). "In historic win, Delco Dems take council seats". Philly.com. Retrieved 5 January 2018.  ^ Stirling, Steven (24 April 2015). "Here are the North, Central and South Jersey
South Jersey
borders as determined by you (INTERACTIVE)". NJ.com. Retrieved 5 January 2018.  ^ "PHILADELPHIA DESIGNATED MARKET DATA". TruckAds. Retrieved 4 January 2018.  ^ a b "County Population Totals and Components of Change: 2010-2016". United States
United States
Census Bureau. Retrieved 4 January 2018.  ^ "Land Area, Population, and Density for States and Counties: 1990". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 4 January 2018.  ^ "OMB BULLETIN NO. 13-01" (PDF). Office of Management and Budget. February 28, 2013. p. 107. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 19, 2013. Retrieved January 4, 2018.  ^ "Community Facts". American FactFidner. United States
United States
Census Bureau. Retrieved 4 January 2018.  ^ "Global Philadelphia". Global Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Association. Retrieved February 2, 2015.  ^ "Dominicans in the Delaware
Delaware
Valley". Medgar Evers College. Archived from the original on February 16, 2011. Retrieved May 13, 2010.  ^ ThreadEx; search for location= "PA - Philadelphia", variable= "Station thread" ^ a b Cite error: The named reference PhillyNOAA was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ Wood, Anthony R. "Snow total at airport gets a boost A new measuring station and technique likely contributed to two 8-inch-plus readings". Philly.com. The Inquirer. Archived from the original on 2014-07-28. Retrieved 2014-06-10.  ^ "Station Name: PA PHILADELPHIA INTL AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-03-13.  ^ "WMO Climate Normals for PHILADELPHIA/INT'L ARPT PA 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-03-11.  ^ Threadex ^ "Station Name: NJ ATLANTIC CITY". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved March 30, 2013.  ^ "Station Name: NJ ATLANTIC CITY INTL AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-03-14.  ^ a b "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2011-12-14.  ^ "WMO Climate Normals for ATLANTIC CITY, NJ 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-03-11.  ^ Average weather for Doylestown Weather Channel Retrieved May 12, 2008 ^ "Climate Statistics for Reading, Pennsylvania". Retrieved March 10, 2012.  ^ "Station Name: DE DOVER". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved February 28, 2013.  ^ "Station Name: DE WILMINGTON NEW CASTLE CO AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved May 5, 2014.  ^ *Family Search.com: Map of Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
in 17th century showing forts & settlements with date of founding ^ "New Hope-Lambertville Route 202 Toll Bridge". Delaware
Delaware
River Joint Toll Brice Commission. Archived from the original on February 25, 2015.  ^ "The 50 best business schools in the world".  ^ Cohen, Micah (29 October 2012). "In Pennsylvania, the Democratic Lean Is Slight, but Durable". New York Times. Retrieved 5 January 2018.  ^ Cohen, Micah (14 July 2012). "In Blue New Jersey, Red Spots May Be Sign of the Past". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved 5 January 2018.  ^ Cohen, Micah (31 August 2012). "Delaware: A Small Example of a Larger Trend". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved 5 January 2018.  ^ Greater Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Tourism
Tourism
Marketing Corporation.

Further reading[edit]

Jean R. Soderlund, Lenape
Lenape
Country: Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
Society before William Penn. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Press, 2014. Mark L. Thompson, The Contest for the Delaware
Delaware
Valley: Allegiance, Identity, and Empire in the Seventeenth Century. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 2013.

External links[edit]

Wikivoyage has a travel guide for Delaware
Delaware
Valley.

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Delaware
Delaware
Valley.

Delaware
Delaware
Valley
Valley
Regional Planning Commission Delaware
Delaware
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Government

City Hall Mayors City Council District Attorney Airport Fire Department Free Library Police Department School district Sister cities Federal: U.S. Mint U.S. District Court for the Eastern Dist. of Pa. U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit

Neighborhoods

Center City North Philadelphia

Lower North Upper North Northwest

Northeast Philadelphia South Philadelphia Southwest Philadelphia West Philadelphia

Museums

Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University African American Museum in Philadelphia American Philosophical Society American Swedish Historical Museum Athenaeum of Philadelphia Barnes Foundation Bartram's Garden Belmont Mansion Betsy Ross House Civil War Museum Cliveden Eastern State Penitentiary Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site Elfreth's Alley Fabric Workshop and Museum Fairmount Water Works Fort Mifflin Franklin Institute Germantown White House Glen Foerd on the Delaware Grand Army of the Republic Civil War Museum and Library Grumblethorpe Hill-Physick-Keith House Historic Strawberry Mansion Historical Society of Frankford Historical Society of Pennsylvania Independence National Historical Park Independence Seaport Museum Insectarium Institute of Contemporary Art John Johnson House John Ruan House La Salle University
La Salle University
Art Museum Lemon Hill Marian Anderson Residence Museum Masonic Temple, Library, and Museum Museum of the American Revolution Mütter Museum National Constitution Center National Liberty Museum National Museum of American Jewish History Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Academy of the Fine Arts Philadelphia
Philadelphia
History Museum Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Museum of Art Philadelphia's Magic Gardens Please Touch Museum Powel House RittenhouseTown Rodin Museum Rosenbach Museum and Library Ryerss Museum and Library Science History Institute Shofuso Japanese House and Garden Stenton Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial University of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Wagner Free Institute of Science Woodmere Art Museum Wyck House

Sports

76ers Eagles Flyers Phillies Soul Union

Squares

Centre Franklin Logan Rittenhouse Washington

Wards

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Related articles

Delaware
Delaware
Valley Independence Hall Liberty Bell

Category Commons Portal

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The 100 most populous metropolitan statistical areas of the United States of America

   

New York, NY Los Angeles, CA Chicago, IL Dallas, TX Houston, TX Washington, DC Philadelphia, PA Miami, FL Atlanta, GA Boston, MA San Francisco, CA Phoenix, AZ Riverside-San Bernardino, CA Detroit, MI Seattle, WA Minneapolis, MN San Diego, CA Tampa, FL Denver, CO St. Louis, MO

Baltimore, MD Charlotte, NC San Juan, PR Orlando, FL San Antonio, TX Portland, OR Pittsburgh, PA Sacramento, CA Cincinnati, OH Las Vegas, NV Kansas City, MO Austin, TX Columbus, OH Cleveland, OH Indianapolis, IN San Jose, CA Nashville, TN Virginia Beach, VA Providence, RI Milwaukee, WI

Jacksonville, FL Memphis, TN Oklahoma City, OK Louisville, KY Richmond, VA New Orleans, LA Hartford, CT Raleigh, NC Birmingham, AL Buffalo, NY Salt Lake City, UT Rochester, NY Grand Rapids, MI Tucson, AZ Honolulu, HI Tulsa, OK Fresno, CA Bridgeport, CT Worcester, MA Albuquerque, NM

Omaha, NE Albany, NY New Haven, CT Bakersfield, CA Knoxville, TN Greenville, SC Oxnard, CA El Paso, TX Allentown, PA Baton Rouge, LA McAllen, TX Dayton, OH Columbia, SC Greensboro, NC Sarasota, FL Little Rock, AR Stockton, CA Akron, OH Charleston, SC Colorado Springs, CO

Syracuse, NY Winston-Salem, NC Cape Coral, FL Boise, ID Wichita, KS Springfield, MA Madison, WI Lakeland, FL Ogden, UT Toledo, OH Deltona, FL Des Moines, IA Jackson, MS Augusta, GA Scranton, PA Youngstown, OH Harrisburg, PA Provo, UT Palm Bay, FL Chattanooga, TN

United States
United States
Census Bureau population estimates for July 1, 2012

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Northeast megalopolis

Major metropolitan areas (over 1,000,000)

New York

city

Philadelphia

city

Washington

city

Boston

city

Baltimore

city

Providence

city

Hartford

city

Other cities (over 100,000)

Newark Jersey City Yonkers Worcester Springfield Alexandria Paterson Bridgeport Elizabeth New Haven Stamford Allentown Manchester Waterbury Cambridge Lowell

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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
portal Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
portal Delaware
Delaware
portal United States
United States
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Coordinates: 39°52′37″N 75°19′23″W / 39.877°N 75.323°W / 39.