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The Beary
Beary
(also known as Byari) is a community concentrated mostly along the southwest coast of India, in coastal Dakshina Kannada, a district in the South Indian
South Indian
state of Karnataka. It is an ethnic society, having its own unique traditions and distinct cultural identity. The Beary
Beary
community holds an important place among the other coastal Muslim communities, like Nawayath's of the Uttara Kannada district, Mappilas
Mappilas
(Moplahs) of the Malabar coast
Malabar coast
and Labbay of the Coromandel coast. Bearys incorporate the local Tulu culture of Dakshina Kannada
Dakshina Kannada
and diverse traditions of the Moplahs of the Malabar coast. The Beary
Beary
community of Dakshina Kannada
Dakshina Kannada
or Tulunadu
Tulunadu
is one among the earliest Muslim inhabitants of India, with a clear history of more than 1350 years.[2] One mosque was built in the Bunder area of Mangalore
Mangalore
by Habeeb Bin Malik, an Arab Da'ee, in 644 A.D.[3][4][5]

Contents

1 Etymology 2 Geographic distribution

2.1 Other sources

3 Participation in the freedom struggle 4 Language

4.1 Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelana (Literary Summit of Bearys)

5 World Beary
Beary
Convention

5.1 World Beary
Beary
Convention & Chammana 2010 5.2 List of periodicals brought out by Bearys 5.3 Paunaraga of Maikala 5.4 Some peculiar names of Bearys 5.5 List of the Books related to Beary
Beary
culture

6 Ornaments 7 Cuisine 8 Beary
Beary
organisations

8.1 Bearys Welfare Forum (BWF), Abu Dhabi 8.2 Bearys Cultural Forum (BCF), UAE 8.3 M.G Rahim (Capman Media Makers )

9 References 10 Other sources 11 External links

Etymology[edit] The word 'Beary' is said to be derived from the Tulu word 'Byara', which means trade or business. Since the major portion of the community was involved in business activities, particularly trading, the local Tulu speaking majority called them as Beary
Beary
or Byari.[6] According to the census of 1891, Dakshina Kannada
Dakshina Kannada
had 92,449 businessmen consisting of 90,345 Bearys, 2,104 Nawayaths and 2,551 non-Muslims. This means that the district had 95,000 individuals involved in business activities. Records prove that, towards the end of the 19th century, the percentage of Muslim traders in the district was as high as 97.3%, and hence the local Tuluvas rightly named this community as Bearys.[7] Another popular theory is that the word "Beary" comes from Arabic
Arabic
word "Bahar" (Arabic: بحر). "Bahar" means "ocean" and "Bahri" (Arabic: بحري) means "sailor or navigator". It is said that the Beary community had trade relations with Arab businessmen travelling to coastal South India, especially the coastline of Tulunadu
Tulunadu
and Malabar. Inscriptions have been found in Barkur
Barkur
that proves the Arab trade links with Tulunadu. A third theory says that the word "Beary" is derived from the root word "Malabar". The great Islamic Da'ee, Malik bin Deenar
Malik bin Deenar
had arrived on the coast of Malabar during the 7th century with a group of Da'ees, or Islamic propagators. A member from his group, Habeeb bin Malik travelled through Tulunadu
Tulunadu
and preached Islam. He had also built mosques in Kasaragod, Mangalore
Mangalore
and Barkur.[5] Geographic distribution[edit] The Bearys make up around 80% of the Dakshina Kannada
Dakshina Kannada
Muslims, with others scattered in the neighbouring districts of Chikmagalur, Shimoga, Kodagu, Hassan and Uttara Kannada. Mumbai
Mumbai
and Goa
Goa
also have a considerable Beary
Beary
population. Also, a good number of Bearys are in the Persian Gulf States
Persian Gulf States
of the Middle East doing a variety of jobs. The total Beary
Beary
population numbers about 1.5 million.[8] Other sources[edit] There are several documents available which prove that at least 90 years prior to the invasion of Muhammad bin Qasim
Muhammad bin Qasim
in North India, Arab Muslim businessmen were thriving in the south. This proves Islam
Islam
was prevalent in South India
India
much before Muslim conquerors came to North India. These facts are available in a research document Mykal, written by Ahmed Noori, who conducted a research on the Beary
Beary
community in 1960. Noori disputes the claim that the first Muslims came to India
India
along with Alauddin Khalji
Alauddin Khalji
between 1296–1316 AD and points out that according to renowned historian, Henry Miers Elliot, (The History of India
India
as told by its own Historians, Part I) the first ship bearing Muslim travellers was seen on the Indian coast as early as 630 AD. H.G.(Hugh George) Rawlinson, in his book: Ancient and Medieval History of India,[9] claims the first Arab Muslims
Arab Muslims
settled on the Indian coast in the last part of the 7th century AD. Bartholomew also has similar things to say about the early Muslim settlers in India. J. Sturrock in his Madras Districts Manuals: South Kanara, says that Parsi and Arab businessmen settled in different places of the Malabar coast
Malabar coast
during the 7th century. Ahmed Noori has quoted these and other sources to validate his argument that the Arab and other settlers came to India much before the Arab,Turk and Afghan conquerors came to North India. Dr. Susheela P. Upadhyaya, a research scholar in Beary bashe and Beary folklore is of the opinion that the Indian west coast came under Islamic influence long before any other part of India
India
was influenced by Islam
Islam
or Muslims.[10] Historical research also reveals that during the rule of Banga and Chowta
Chowta
dynasty in the 16th century, Beary
Beary
men had served as seamen in the naval force. The Chowta
Chowta
dynasty queen, Rani Abbakka
Abbakka
had personally supervised the construction of dam at Malali; she had appointed Bearys for boulder work.[11] An ancient mythical work – Keralolpathi – reveals that a king of Malabar, Cheraman Perumal, embraced Islam
Islam
during the very beginning days of the advent of Islam
Islam
in the Arab land. Thus the Arabs had royal patronage to practice and propagate Islam
Islam
in the Malabar area. They were also given the permission of sea trading with a royal patronage. Because of the Da'wah
Da'wah
activities of Arab traders, many vulnerable people were lured into islam.. The Portuguese lost their dominance during the rule of Hyder Ali
Hyder Ali
and Tippu Sultan
Tippu Sultan
in Mysore. During this period the Beary
Beary
Muslims again received royal patronage and intensified their sea trade activities.[12] Participation in the freedom struggle[edit] The Bearys of the coast actively participated in the Indian freedom struggle against Portugal and British colonialism. There were a number of Beary
Beary
men who served in the naval force, and also as soldiers and military commanders in the army of brave queen of Chowta
Chowta
dynasty, Rani Abbakka
Abbakka
(Kannada: ರಾಣಿ ಅಬ್ಬಕ್ಕ) who ruled in the Ullal
Ullal
region. The Bearys had also joined the army of Nawab Hyder Ali and Tipu Sultan
Tipu Sultan
of Mysore. Historians and researchers have enlisted famous Beary
Beary
personalities who participated in the freedom struggle of India. Many such freedom fighters were imprisoned by British, and a few died during imprisonment. A sixteenth-century Arabic
Arabic
work of Malabar, Tuhfah al Mujahideen or Tuhafat Ul Mujahideen compiled by Shaikh Zainuddin Makhdoom II (grand son of Shaikh Zainuddin Makhdoom I) had motivated Malabar Muslims which had influence on Bearys of the Tulunadu
Tulunadu
as well to fight the foreign invaders. Thus the Bearys had actively participated in the freedom struggle against Portugal and British rule. Language[edit] Main article: Beary
Beary
bashe The dialect spoken by Beary
Beary
(Byaris), is known as Beary
Beary
Bashe.[13] While Muslims of Uttara Kannada, called Nawayaths, speak a dialect of Konkani, and the Mappilas
Mappilas
of Kerala
Kerala
speak Malayalam
Malayalam
(Mappila Malayalam), the Bearys spoke a language made of Malayalam
Malayalam
idioms with Tulu phonology and grammar.[13] This dialect was traditionally known as Mappila
Mappila
Malayalam
Malayalam
because of Bearys close contact with Mappilas.[13] Due to vast influence of Tulu for centuries, it is today considered as a language, close to Malayalam
Malayalam
and Tulu.[13] Beary bashe is largely influenced by the Arabic
Arabic
language.[14] Most of the Bearys especially in coastal area still use a lot of Bearified Arabic
Arabic
words during their daily transactions. Saan, Pinhana, Gubboosu, Dabboosu, Pattir, Rakkasi, Seintaan, Kayeen, are the few words used in Beary bashe that have their roots in Arabic
Arabic
language. Beary Bashe also has words related to Tamil and Malayalam. Tamil and Malayalam
Malayalam
speakers can understand Beary
Beary
by about 75%. Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelana (Literary Summit of Bearys)[edit] Total Four Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelanas (The Beary
Beary
Literature Summit) have been taken place so far. Cultural activities, exhibition related to Beary
Beary
culture and society, talks on Beary
Beary
society by Beary
Beary
scholars, publications and Beary
Beary
literature stalls are the centre of attraction during any Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelana. The first Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelana, held on November 11, 1998 at Town hall Mangalore, was presided by B.M. Iddinabba, Poet and Former Member of Legislative Assembly, Ullal
Ullal
constituency, Karnataka
Karnataka
State. The second Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelana, held on November 21, 1999 at the Indian Auditorium, Bantwal, was presided by Golthamajalu Abdul Khader Haji. The third Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelana, held on October 28, 2001 at the Halima Sabju Auditorium, Udyavara, udupi, was presided by Beary research scholar Prof. B.M. Ichlangod. A demand for Beary
Beary
Academy was submitted to the government at that sammelana. The Fourth Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelana was presided by novelist Fakir Mohammed Katpady. Fourth Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelana[edit] The Fourth Beary
Beary
Sahitya Sammelana (The Fourth Beary
Beary
Literary Summit), held at Vokkaligara Samaja Bhavana in the city of Chikmagalur on 27 February 2007 which demanded that the state government establish a Beary Sahitya Academy. The Sammelana was jointly organized by Kendra Beary Sahitya Parishat, Mangalore, and Chickmagalur Bearygala Okkoota. Chikmagalur is the district that harbors the second largest Beary population, next to Dakshina Kannada. The theme of the Sammelana was Prosperity through Literature, Development through Education and Integrity for Security. [15] The sammelana also took up issues such as official recognition to the Beary Bashe by the State Government, setting up of Beary
Beary
Sahitya Academy, and recognition to the community as linguistic minority. It is said that Beary Bashe is as old as Tulu and spoken by more than 1,500,000 people around the world. The history of this dialect is at least 1200 years old.[10] World Beary
Beary
Convention[edit] The World Beary
Beary
Convention was held 2006 in Dubai under the banner World Beary
Beary
Sammelana & Chammana 2006.[15] The word Chammana stands for felicitation. Since the organizers felicitated a few Beary
Beary
dignitaries during this world convention held in Dubai, UAE, the convention is called World Beary
Beary
Sammelana & Chammana 2006. The Convention was also attended by several dignitaries which included Dr. B.K.Yusuf, President/Patron of Karnataka
Karnataka
Sangha, Dubai, M.B. Abdul Rahiman, Renowned Lawyer and Notary, B.M. Farooque, managing director, Fiza Group, Shiraj Haji. Director Universal Export Tradeways. S.M. Syed Khalil, Galadai Group, Dubai, M.B. Noor Mohamed, MD. Fakruddin, managing director, Ajmal Group, Mel, Abdul Jaleel, Abdussalam Puthige, Editor in Chief, Varthabharathi Kannada Daily, Haju Jamalluddin, Chairman, Crescent School, Shamshudeen, P.T. Abdul Rahiman, General Secretary of Indian Islamic Centre, T.S. Shettigar, Jamalludin, Apsara Group, Dr. Viquar Azeem, Dr. Azad Moopen, Ganesh Rai, M.K. Madhavan, Kumar, Indian Association Dubai, Kanukaran Shetty, President Hotel, Prabhakar, KOD, K.P. Ahmed, Yaseen Malpe etc. Some Beary
Beary
dignitaries have been facilitated during the convention. World Beary
Beary
Convention & Chammana 2010[edit] Beary
Beary
hosts a 2-day event, the World Beary
Beary
Convention & Mega Cultural Event – Chammana 2010, held during 2 and 3 April 2010 at Zabil Ball Room, Radisson Blu Hotel, Creek Side, Dubai.[16] During this convention Beary
Beary
Personality of the year 2010 award was given to Mr. Mumtaz Ali, and Star of Bearys award for the year 2010 was conferred on Zakariya Bajpe.[17] Media of the Year award was jointly awarded to Varthabharathi a renowned Kannada daily (published from Mangalore
Mangalore
and Bangalore) and Daijiworld.com, a web based newsportal, for their contribution towards media. Abdussalam Puthige, on behalf of Varta Bharti, and representatives of Daijiworld received the award from Mr. C. M. Ibrahim, Former Union Minister.[18] List of periodicals brought out by Bearys[edit]

No. Name Editor/Printer/Publisher/Owner

1 Jyothi Kamal Hyder(editor) owner(Mohammed sherule)

2 Swatantra Bharata Kamal Hyder

3 Antaranga Kamal Hyder

4 Human Affairs Kamal Hyder

5 Hamdard Raheem Ahmad

6 Sadakat Post Raheem Ahmad

7 Udaya Chandra F.H. Odeyar

8 Nawa Shakti B.M.A. Rafeeq

9 Shanti Sandesh Dr. M.M. Salih

10 Divya Vani C.K. Hussain

11 Musalman C.K. Hussain

12 Millat A.T.M. Shafi

13 Hilal A.T.M. Shafi

14 Amaanat Abdul Raheem Haji

15 Agni K.H. Hussain Mulki

16 Bhooloka Abdullah Belthangady

17 Himmat Ibrahim Kareem

18 Ananta M.A. Raheem

19 Apsara Dr. Wahab Doddamane

20 Shikshakara Vani J.M. Mohammed Master

21 Dharma Vani Hameed Kandak

22 Popular Hameed Kandak

23 Nawaneet Muhsin Haji Caup

24 Al Misbah Dr. K.M. Shah Musliyar

25 Aalamul Huda Dr. K.M. Shah Musliyar

26 Sarala Patha Dr. K.M. Shah Musliyar

27 Sandesha Abu Raihan Ahmed Noori

28 Kitaab Abu Raihan Ahmed Noori

29 The Message Abu Raihan Ahmed Noori

30 Mesco Varthe Abul Hasan Muhammad Moulavi

31 AL Miftaah B.M. Mohammed Mangalanti

32 Al Muneer Saletore Aboobaker Faizi

33 Al Ihsan Mohammed Ullal

34 Tawa Nidhi Prof. B.M. Ichlangod

35 Media Times Prof. B.M. Ichlangod

36 Sanmarga Ibrahim Saeed

37 Anupama M. Sadullah

38 Al Ansar Haji Ibrahim Bawa [1]

39 Moilanji Hamza saqafi Bantwal

40 Pavitra Sandesha ([South Karnataka
Karnataka
Salafi Movement Mangalore][2])

41 Mustaqeem (Eden Publication)

42 Hi Puttur Mittur Hameed Kandak

43 Ishara Patrike Ismail Shafi

44 AL Aqsa T.M. Haneef Maulavi

45 Puttur Mitra Ibbatulla Kadaba

46 Pushpa Mandaara Aziz Bajpe

47 Asar Vani Aziz Bajpe

48 Jana Vahini K.M. Khaid

49 Hoodota A.C.M. Saletore

50 Firdous M.E Mohammed

51 Hasiru Bhoomi T.H. Ibrahim Musliyar

52 Al Qamar Shareef Moodabidri

53 Kodagu
Kodagu
Kesari B.A. Shamsuddin

54 Janadesha Patrike U. Muhammad Nazeer

55 Nawa Keerti B. M. Idinabba

56 Karawali Maruta Iqbal Ahmed Kuthar

57 Encounter Iqbal Ahmed Kuthar

58 Eye Special
Special
News Iqbal Ahmed Kuthar

59 Lathi Charge Ismail Moodushedde

60 Hello Mangalooru Raheem Uchil

61 Noble Universe B.M. Haneef

62 Islam
Islam
and Science S.E. Abdul Rahman

63 The Islamic Guidance M Anwar Bajpe

64 Payaswini Sullia M.B.M. Madani

65 Sunni Sndesha K.M.S. Faizi

66 Baala Sandesha K.M.S. Faizi

67 Samyukta Prabha Mohammed Rafi

68 Beary Akbar Ullal

69 Utkarsha Akbar Ullal

70 Beary
Beary
Varthe Basheer Baikampady

71 Beary
Beary
Times Kuwainda Hamzatullah

72 Kittale Naadu Kuwainda Hamzatullah

73 Pernal Umer U.H.

74 Indian News A.S. Anduka

75 Special
Special
News Bawa Padrangi

76 Varthabharathi (kn:ವಾತಾ೯ ಭಾರತಿ) Abdussalam Puthige

77 Mesco Varthe Moulavi Abul Hasan

78 Sunnath M.M.Saqafi

79 Sunni Vani Muhyuddeen Kamil Saqafi Thoke

80 Madarangi Aboobakkar faizy

81 Sirathe musthaqeem Da'wa Publications [3]

82 Kusuma bala masika -

83 Prasthootha K.M.Sherif

84 Bearys of Tulunadu Prof.B.M. Ichlangod

Some of these periodicals are still being published and reaching to the hands of a sizeable population of Tulunadu
Tulunadu
and other adjacent districts and to the Persian Gulf States. Paunaraga of Maikala[edit] Before the advent of the Portuguese, Maikala
Maikala
or Mangalore
Mangalore
was one of the main centres of Jains with many Jain Muts, Basadis and also palaces. Especially the Bunder area Maikala
Maikala
was dominated by rich Jain houses. The Jains who enjoyed economical and social status maintained a system known as Jaina Beedu, which literally means Jain House.[19] Later when these Jains embraced Islam, they still maintained this Beedu system as status symbol. Beedu can be translated in Beary
Beary
bashe as Aga which means House. The Paunar Aga or Paunaraga – which literally means sixteen houses – of high status are listed in the table below.

16 Houses of Beedu  1. Beliyabbaka Aga / Doddamane  2. Beliye Ballal Aga  3. Cheriye Ballal Aga  4. Beedhire Ballal Aga  5. Pandiol Aga  6. Chettra Aga   / Bandassale Aga  7. Kozhikkan Aga  8. Bawukana Aga/ Kunharakana  9. Moosarikana Aga 10. Kachman Aga 11. Sayirikana Aga 12. Khayirikana Aga 13. Bubakana Aga 14. Asakhana Aga 15. Siyalikhana Aga 16. Getre Aga

These houses enjoyed supreme social status amongst Bearys throughout the 19th century and treated other Bearys as second-class citizens. The people belonging to these houses were identified as Agakkar which means the People of the House. The history of these houses has a short-lived glory that these houses enjoyed socially and economically. Many of the social customs that the people of Paunaraga observed were special to them and had no roots in Islam. Thus the lifestyle of Agakkar of the Beary
Beary
community was largely influenced by Jains. Most of the ornaments used by Agakkar was of Jain pattern and had Jain names. Kharjana is the jewel box used by both Jains and Bearys. Today the people of Paunaraga or Agakkar have lost their social and economic status but some of the houses still remain in Bunder area. Their surnames tell the glory once they enjoyed. Next to Agakkar comes Taalakkar and then Taala-illatavar. All these system the Bearys maintained in the olden days which they inherited from local people. However these systems are vanished with the advent of Islamic literature of late. Some peculiar names of Bearys[edit] Typically, Muslim community people name their children for Arabic roots. But olden day Bearys had some strange names which are not seen anywhere else in the Muslim world. Although those peculiar names are now vanishing, here are some such examples: Kayiri, Sayiri, Sayirabba, Cheyya, Cheyyabba, Saunhi, Kayinhi, Sekunhi, Baduva, Mayabba, Puthabba, Hammabba, Cheyyabba, Ijjabba, Kunha, Kunhi, Bava, Bavunhi, Kunhibavu, Puttubavu Unha, Unhi, Unhimon, Iddinabba, Podiya, Podimonu, Pallikunhi, Kunhipalli, Kidavaka, Abbu, Abbonu, Chakaka, Addiyaka (Addi), Pudiyampule. List of the Books related to Beary
Beary
culture[edit]

No. Title Author

1 Muslims in Dakshina Kannada Dr. A. Wahab Doddamane

2 English – Kannada – Beary: dictionary*[20] Dr. A. Wahab Doddamane

3 Maikala*[21] Abu Raihan Ahmed Noori

4 Beary bashe matthu Jaanapada Kathegalu* Dr. Susheela Upadhyaya

5 Tulunada Muslimaru*[22] Prof. B.M. Ichlangod

6 Moilaanji*[23] Hamza Malar

7 8 9

Beary
Beary
Muslimaru Mallige Balli (The Jasmine Shrub) Tharavad

Hamza Malar Abdul Raheem Teekay U.A. Kasim Ullal

These books are available at the largest library in the world, the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in Washington, D.C., US.

Ornaments[edit] The beary women has excessive love for ornaments and uses it on every possible occasion such as Mangila, Sunnat Mangila, Appate Mangila, Birnd, Moilanji and other social gatherings. There were different types of ornaments used by beary community in past which is at the verge of vanishing today due to the cultural invasion and urbanisation. These ornaments are made out of mainly gold and silver and used for the ornamentation of head, ears, neck, waist, wrist, fingers and feet. Beary
Beary
research scholars are of the opinion that Beary
Beary
ornaments were largely influenced by Jain ornament patterns. The ornament storage box used by Bearys was made out of brass and other metals was also used by Jain community and was called Kharjana by both Bearys and Jains.[24] Cuisine[edit]

Poo-pole and pinde

Beary
Beary
cuisine is highly influenced by the South Indian
South Indian
Cuisine. Just like Mangalorean cuisine it uses a lot of coconut, curry leaves, ginger, chilli and spices like pepper and cardamom. Beary
Beary
cuisine boasts of a special kind of biryani, which is very different from the other types made elsewhere. Rice preparations, both fresh and dry fish, meat and eggs enjoy top place in Beary
Beary
daily menu. A few traditional dishes very popular amongst all the Tulu communities have unique names in Beary
Beary
dialect. Pindi/pinde, basale-pinde, kunhi-pinde, erchiro-pinde, bisaliyappa (bisali beetiye appa/kaltappa), tondaredo-appa (syame), guliyappa, muttere-appa, neiyappa/nei-appa, chekkero-appa, manhel elero appa, acchi-appa, daliyappa, baale-appa, pondatte-appa, sank-roli, pattir (a distorted version of Arabic
Arabic
fatirah), nei pattir, pole, poo-pole, pulcho-pole, vodu-pole, uppu-molavu, kanhi, methero-kanhi, nei-kanhi, kulte kanhi, manni, nombure kanchi, pirni etc. are to name a few.[25][26][27] Beary
Beary
organisations[edit] Today the Beary
Beary
community of coastal Karnataka
Karnataka
is surging ahead in diverse fields like international business, education, medicine and technology. Bearys have also formed various social and cultural organisations of diversified interests. Beary's Welfare Association, Bangalore Beary's Welfare Association is based in Bengaluru
Bengaluru
the capital of Karnataka
Karnataka
state. The association came into being on 21 March 1988 with a motive to provide a means of communication and integration, and also to provide a platform to work towards the betterment of the Beary
Beary
community in all aspects of life.[28][better source needed] Beary
Beary
Welfare Association has organised a number of cultural programs every year right from its very inception. Beary
Beary
Prakashana is its sister concern and involved in print and publication activities. It has published a number of titles on Beary
Beary
culture, Beary
Beary
bashe, Beary history, and also on research studies on Bearys. Bearys Welfare Forum (BWF), Abu Dhabi[edit] Bearys Welfare Forum of Abu Dhabi, popularly known as BWF is an association of Beary
Beary
expatriats in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. It does community activities and mainly community welfare activities.,[29][30] BWF was established in the year 2004 with an intention of working for all sections of the society. It has helped the victims of communal riots in Mangalore
Mangalore
by providing medical assistance and other aids. The BWF gained popularity when it held mass marriage ceremony of twelve pairs of poor and deserving youth at the Shadi Mahal of Mangalore city.[31] Bearys Welfare Forum, Abu Dhabi, organised a mass wedding ceremony at Milagres Auditorium, here on Monday 13 July 2009. Sixteen couples were solemnised in marriage by Kazi Al Haj Abdulla Musliar Chembarika.[32][33] Bearys Cultural Forum (BCF), UAE[edit] Bearys Cultural Forum (BCF), UAE was constituted to provide education to the poor masses of the coastal parts of the State of Karnataka. BCF's main objective is to promote, educate and create social, cultural and educational awareness amongst the Bearys and the downtrodden population of the coastal Karnataka
Karnataka
State and the UAE. The BCF regularly conducts cultural, sports, talent search, educational activities, Career Guidance Seminars, Iftar Party, etc. every year. BCF also provides educational scholarship to the poor downtrodden students for pursuing their higher studies in the field of Medicines, Engineering, Pharmacy, business, nursing, Journalism, Dentistry, etc. BCF is now committed to conduct "World Beary
Beary
Convention & Chammana 2010" in Dubai, U.A.E.[34] M.G Rahim (Capman Media Makers )[edit] M.G Rahim has been active in ' Beary
Beary
Movement' for the last eight years. It has felicitated Beary
Beary
poets, writers and others who have come up with remarkable achievements in the society. "beary naseehath majlis", Surmatho Kannu, Maafi Mushkil, Pernal nilaavu', "Moilanjipoo", "Maikalthoraja", and stage programme beary oppane kali, beary kolkali, pernal nilaavu, Eid special programme on costal T.V channel yearly are some of the productions of Capman Media Makers.,[35] ..../ References[edit]

^ Newspaper: The Hindu, Saturday, 13 Oct 2007 Archived 5 February 2012 at WebCite ^ Ahmed Noori, Maikala, Preface to 1st edition (1960) ^ Ichlangod B.M., Tulunada Muslimaru – Byari Samskruti p.19 (1997) ^ Gopalan Nair C, Moplas of Malabar p.20-21 ^ a b Ahmed Noori, Maikala, II edition, p.11 (1997) ^ Ahmed Noori, Maikala
Maikala
p.17 (1960) ^ Ichlangod B.M., Tulunada Muslimaru – Byari Samskruti p. 39 (1997) ^ The Hindu, Saturday, 13 Oct 2007 Archived 5 February 2012 at WebCite ^ ISBN 81-86050-79-5 Ancient and Medieval History of India ^ Dr. Susheela P. Upadhyaya, Beary Bashe mattu Janapada Kathegalu, p. 5 (1997) ^ Dr. Susheela P. Upadhyaya, Beary Bashe mattu Janapada Kathegalu, p. 7 (1997) ^ Dr. Susheela P. Upadhyaya, Beary Bashe mattu Janapada Kathegalu, p. 9(1997) ^ a b c d Upadhyaya, U. Padmanabha. Coastal Karnataka: Studies in Folkloristic and Linguistic Traditions of Dakshina Kannada
Dakshina Kannada
Region of the Western Coast of India. Udupi: Rashtrakavi Govind Pai Samshodhana Kendra, 1996.P- ix . ISBN 81-86668-06-3 . First All India Conference of Dravidian Linguistics, Thiruvananthapuram, 1973 ^ Arabic
Arabic
and other language influence Archived 15 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine. ^ Daijiworld Online, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 ^ Dubai : World Beary
Beary
Convention Kicks off in Style ^ Dubai: Beary
Beary
Fraternity comes together at the World Beary
Beary
Convention ^ World Beary
Beary
Convention in Dubai on April 1, 2 ^ Ichlangod B.M., Tulunada Muslimaru – Byari Samskruti p.50 (1997) ^ http://catalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&BBID=13289230&v3=1 ^ http://catalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&BBID=13732715&v3=1 ^ http://catalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&BBID=13401424&v3=1 ^ http://catalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&CMD=lccn%222002302742%22&v3=1&CNT=10 ^ Ichlangod B.M., Tulunada Muslimaru – Byari Samskruti p.76 (1997) ^ http://www.coastaldigest.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=20165:beary-samskrithika&catid=57:news-stories&Itemid=68 ^ http://mangalorean.com/news.php?newstype=broadcast&broadcastid=220895 ^ http://www.daijiworld.com/news/news_disp.asp?n_id=94915 ^ Beary's Welfare Association ^ BWF Felicitates U T Khader at Mangalore ^ Bearys Welfare Forum holds Iftar at Abu Dhabi ^ Anupama monthly, March 2008, page 28 ^ http://www.daijiworld.com/news/news_disp.asp?n_id=62550 ^ http://www.mangalorean.com/news.php?newstype=broadcast&broadcastid=134865 ^ http://www.coastaldigest.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4440:bearys-cultural-forum&catid=57:news-stories&Itemid=68 ^ Capman Media Newly started Online News Named http://www.bearyvoice.com News about of Capman Media Makers

Other sources[edit]

Bearys of the coast, Article in Deccan Herald 12 December 1997 by B.M Hanif. H.G. Rawlinson, Ancient and Medieval History of India Sturrock, J., Madras District Manual. South Kanara (2 vols., Madras, 1894–1895). Influence of Muslim thought on the east [4] retrieved 21 May 2006. Muslims in Dakshina Kannada: a historical study up to 1947 and survey of recent developments, Author Wahab Doddamane, A. Green Words publication. Mangalore, 1993 [5]

External links[edit]

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Zeenath Baksh Juma Masjid Another link on Zeenath Baksh Juma Masjid Web page with information on Bearys Vijay Times' Article on Ahmed Noori Article on Beary's claim to a distinct ethnic identity Bearys Welfare Association Home Page The Arabi- Malayalam
Malayalam
Script Arabi- Malayalam
Malayalam
history References to Zainudhin Makhdum II More references to Zainudhin Makhdum II The Beary
Beary
Welfare Association press release Beary
Beary
lyricist and composer Beary
Beary
book on Namaz (Islamic prayer) Article which refutes claim that Beary bashe is only spoken by Muslims Beary
Beary
community mentioned in Coorg based website Kudroli Jamia Masjid website

v t e

Indian Muslim communities

Majority

Arain Arghon Ansari Awan Baghban Balti Behna Bhatiara Bhishti Bisati Chaush Dakhini
Dakhini
Muslims Dard Dhobi Ghosi Gujjar Hyderabadi Iraqi (Tamimi) Jat Khanzada Kashmiri Kunjra Malkana Manihar Mappila Meo Mughal Pathans Purigpa Qassab Muslim Rajput Ranghar Rangrez Saifi Shaikh Sayyid Salmani Siddi Teli

Minority

Assamese Bengali Bhili Dogra Gondi Gujarati Konkani Nawayath Marathi Marwari Meitei Oriya Punjabi Tamil Telugu Labbay Goan Muslims Alavi Bohra

Bihar

Abdal Ansari Bakho Bisati Chamail Churihar Chik Gaddi Idrisi Khanzada Kulhaiya Lal Begi Malik of Bihar Mirasi Mirshikar Mughal Muker Pasi Nat Pamaria Pathans Rayeen Sai Sapera Sayyid Syed (Mallick) Shaikh of Bihar Shershahabadia Thakurai Teli

Gujarat

Abdal Alavi Bohra Ansari Arabs Attarwala Bafan Baloch Banjara Behlim Bhadala Bharbhunja Bhishti Chhipa Chunara Chundrigar Dawoodi Bohra Dhobi Dhuldhoya Doodwala Faqir Galiara Ghanchi Ghanchi-Pinjara Halaypotra Hingorja Hingora Jats of Kutch Juneja Kadia Kagzi Ker Khalifa Khaskheli Khoja Machiyar Makrani Malik of Gujarat Mandali Makwana Manka Mansoori Memon Meta Qureshi Miyana Molesalam Momna Mughal Multani Multani Lohar Mutwa Nagori Nayak Node Panar Parmar Patani Bohra Patni Jamat Pathans Salaat Samma Sandhai Muslims Sanghar Shaikhs of Gujarat Shaikhda Sayyid
Sayyid
of Gujarat Siddi Sipahi Soomra Sulaymani
Sulaymani
Bohra Sunni Bohra Tai Turk Jamat Vora Patel Vyapari Wagher

Karnataka

Baghban Beary Chaush Chhaparband Kodava Maaple Konkani Muslims Nawayath Pinjara Siddi Assadi

Kerala

Mappila Keyi Thangal Marakkar Ossan Pusalan Thulukkar

Madhya Pradesh

Ansari Banjara Dawoodi Bohra Mughal Dhobi Pathans Shaikh Sayyid

Maharashtra

Attar Baghban Bhishti Chaush Chhaparband Dawoodi Bohra Dhawad Faqir Garodi Gavandi Kachar Kagzi Konkani Muslims Momin Muslim Raj Gond Qassab Saiqalgar Tadvi Bhil

Rajasthan

Ansari Bhutta Cheetah Chadwa Dawoodi Bohra Deshwali Gaddi Ghosi Hela Mehtar Hiranbaz Kandera Khadem Khanzada Langha Manganiar Merat Meo Mughal Pathans Pinjara Qaimkhani Rangrez Rath Shaikhs of Rajasthan Silawat Sindhi-Sipahi Singiwala Sorgar

Tamil Nadu

Kayalar Labbay Marakkar Pathans Rowther Mappila

Uttar Pradesh

Ahbans Khanzada Ansari Atishbaz Bachgoti Khanzada Baghban Baluch Bandhmati Banjara Barhai Behlim Banu Israil Behna Bhand Bharbhunja Bhale Sultan Khanzada Bhatti Khanzada Bhatiara Bhishti Bhumihar Musalman Bisati Chandel Khanzada Chhipi Chik Dakhini Dafali Dhagi Dharhi Dhobi Musalmaan Dogar Fareedi Faqir Gaddi Gautam Khanzada Ghosi Goriya Gujjar
Gujjar
Musalmaan Halalkhor Halwai Idrisi Iraqi (Tamimi) Jhojha Kabaria Kakorvi Shaikh Kamangar Kamboh Kasgar Kayastha Musalman Khanzada Khokhar Khanzada Khumra Kingharia Kunjra Lal Begi Lalkhani Rajput Madari Mandarkia Malkana Manihar Meo Milki Mirasi Mughal Mujavir Muker Muley Jat Nagar Muslims Nalband Nanbai Naqqal Panchpiria Pankhiya Pathans Putliwale Qalandar Qassab Qaum-e-Punjaban Qidwai Rai Bhatt Raj Rajput Musalmaan Ramaiya Rangrez Rayeen Rohilla Sadaat Amroha Sadaat-e-Bara Sadaat-e-Bilgram Sai Saifi Salmani Sayyid
Sayyid
of Uttar Pradesh Shaikh of Uttar Pradesh Shaikh Ja'fri Shaikhzada Siddiqui Sikarwar Khanzada Teli Musalmaan Turk Tyagi Musalmaan Zamindara

West Bengal

Abdal Dawoodi Bohra Bedia Faqir Ghosi Iraqi (Tamimi) Kahar Kan Kela Lodha Malla Nashya Pa