Parouse.com
 Parouse.com



The 2010 Asian Games, also known as the XVI Asian Games
Asian Games
(Chinese: 第十六届亚洲运动会; pinyin: Dì Shíliù Jiè Yàzhōu Yùndònghuì), was a multi-sport event celebrated in Guangzhou, China from 12 to 27 November 2010, although several events has commenced from 7 November 2010. Guangzhou
Guangzhou
was the second Chinese city to host the Games, after Beijing
Beijing
in 1990. A total of 9,704 athletes from 45 National Olympic Committees
National Olympic Committees
(NOCs) competed in 476 events from 42 sports and disciplines (28 Olympic sports
Olympic sports
and 14 non-Olympic sports), making it the largest event in the history of the Games. Due to reductions in the number of sports to be contested for the 2014 Asian Games, these Games marked the final time that six non-Olympic events would be held during the Asian Games. The Games were co-hosted by Dongguan, Foshan
Foshan
and Shanwei, the three neighbouring cities. A total of 53 venues were used to host the events including 11 constructed for use at the Games. The design concept of the official logo of these Asian Games
Asian Games
was based on the legend about the Guangzhou, featured a stylised calligraphic "Stone Statue of Five Goats in Yuexiu Hill", a symbol of the host city.[1] The opening and closing ceremonies were held along the Pearl River in Haixinsha Island, and was the first time in history that the opening ceremony for a major sports event was not held inside a stadium. The final medal tally was led by China, followed by South Korea
South Korea
and third place Japan. China
China
set a new Games record with 199 gold medals.[2] Three World and 103 Asian records were broken.[3] In addition, the badminton men's singles gold medalist Lin Dan
Lin Dan
was voted as most valuable player (MVP).[4] The President of Olympic Council of Asia Sheikh Ahmed Al-Fahad Al-Ahmed Al-Sabah
Ahmed Al-Fahad Al-Ahmed Al-Sabah
hailed the Games as "outstanding" and "one of the best ever".[5]

Contents

1 Organisation

1.1 Bid 1.2 Marketing 1.3 Financing 1.4 Venues 1.5 Transport

2 Torch relay 3 Calendar 4 Games

4.1 Opening ceremony 4.2 Sports 4.3 Closing ceremony 4.4 Medal table

5 Participating nations 6 Controversies

6.1 Sports 6.2 Languages 6.3 Environment

7 See also 8 References 9 External links

Organisation[edit] Bid[edit]

Guangzhou

Location of Guangzhou
Guangzhou
in China.

The Olympic Council of Asia
Olympic Council of Asia
(OCA) selected Guangzhou
Guangzhou
to host the 2010 Games at their 23rd general assembly session in Doha, Qatar, site of the 2006 Asian Games, on July 1, 2004.[6] Seoul
Seoul
and Amman
Amman
dropped out before their bids were officially selected by the OCA, leaving only two candidate cities— Guangzhou
Guangzhou
and Kuala Lumpur. Seoul
Seoul
withdrew after considering the short span of time between 2002 and 2010, as South Korea
South Korea
hosted the 2002 Games in Busan.[7] Evaluation committee of the OCA, headed by the then vice-president of the association Celso Dayrit inspected both the final bidders. Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur
was forced to withdraw its bid after the declaration of the Malaysian Government
Malaysian Government
on April 15, 2004 that it wouldn't support the Olympic Council of Malaysia with a Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur
bid, due to the high cost of hosting the Games, leaving Guangzhou
Guangzhou
as the sole bidder.[8][9] Marketing[edit] The official emblem of the Games was unveiled at Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall on November 26, 2006. It is a stylized representation of Guangzhou's "Statue of the Five Goats" (五羊雕像) fused with a running track. The goat, in Chinese tradition, is a blessing and brings people luck while the host city Guangzhou
Guangzhou
is known as the "City of Goats".[10] The orange and yellow emblem also resembles a flame.

Official mascot of 2010 Asian Games

The mascots of the Games were the five sporty rams. They were unveiled on April 28, 2008 at the Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Baiyun International Convention and Exhibition Center.[11][12] The five rams, including four small with one large, were named– A Xiang (祥), A He (和), A Ru (如), A Yi (意) and Le Yangyang (樂洋洋). The Chinese character "yang," or "goat," is an auspicious symbol because, when read together, the Chinese names of the five rams are a message of blessing, literally meaning "harmony, blessings, success and happiness" (祥和如意樂洋洋).[13] The official theme song was released on September 30, 2010, and is called "Reunion" (in Chinese, "Chongfeng" [重逢]). It was composed by Wu Liqun, with lyrics written by Xu Rongkai, while the English version was translated by Chen Ning Yang, a Chinese-American physicist, and his wife, Weng Fan. The song was also performed by Sun Nan and Bella Yao (姚贝娜).[14] Sun Nan then performed it again with Mao Amin for a music video.[15] Financing[edit] On March 11, 2005, Lin Shusen, then party secretary of the Guangzhou Municipal Committee of the Communist Party of China
Communist Party of China
(CPC) said the Games "will not cost more than ¥2 billion",[16] in stark contrast to an earlier report, which had claimed that the cost could exceed ¥200 billion.[17] In March 2009, the director of the marketing department of the Games, Fang Da’er, claimed that the Games were short of funds, due to lack of sponsorship and the global financial crisis.[18] An informal estimate put the Games' expenditure at about US$420 million and revenue at US$450 million.[19] On October 13, 2010, Wan Qingliang, mayor of Guangzhou
Guangzhou
at the time, officially revealed in a press conference that the total cost of staging the Asian Games
Asian Games
and Asian Para Games
Asian Para Games
is about ¥122.6 billion ($18.37 billion), with ¥109 billion spent on the city's infrastructure, ¥6.3 billion on the venues and some ¥7.3 billion spent on Games' operation.[20] The full spending details would be released before 2013, according to the city's finance chief Zhang Jieming.[21] Venues[edit]

Guangdong Olympic Stadium
Guangdong Olympic Stadium
used for all the athletics events

Main article: Venues of the 2010 Asian Games A total of 53 competition venues and 17 training venues were used for the Games, with four venues located outside of Guangzhou. Events took place at 42 pre-existing venues; eleven competition venues and one training venues were constructed for the Games, while the rest were renovated. Other venues included the Asian Games
Asian Games
Town, which consists of the Athletes' Village, Technical Officials' Village, Media Village, Main Media Center and International Broadcast Center.[22] Organisers revealed that the total investment was over ¥15 billion.[23] On April 19, 2009, organisers chose Haixinsha Island, along with the Pearl River, as the venue for the opening and closing ceremonies, the only venue which was not for competition purposes.[24] Transport[edit]

MTR KTT decorated to promote the Games.

Guangzhou's public transportation infrastructure was expanded significantly as a part of the preparation for the Games. Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport had been upgraded, in contracted to Crisplant (former FKI Logistex), to support massive volume of passengers.[25] A new Wuhan– Guangzhou
Guangzhou
High-Speed Railway was opened on December 26, 2009, shorten the travel time between two destinations.[26] In order to ease the traffic congestion and air pollution, the government ordered 40 percent reduction of vehicles and offered 1,000 buses during the Games and Para Games.[27][28] The government also had a free-ride offer for public transportation during the month of Games, but cancelled one week prior to the Games due to overwhelming response from the citizens.[29][30] Instead, government offered ¥150 (US$22.58) cash subsidies to each household with permanent residence for commuting purposes.[31] Torch relay[edit]

Torch relay route

Main article: 2010 Asian Games
Asian Games
torch relay Two torch designs were short-listed in September 2009 for the 2010 Asian Games. A design named "The Tide" was chosen over one named "Exploit" by the organizers as the torch of the Games. "The Tide" weighs 98 g and is 70 cm long, and is tall and straight in shape, while dynamic in terms of image.[32][33] The torch relay route was unveiled on March 4, 2010. Due to financial reasons it remained within the confines of Guangdong
Guangdong
province and was planned to travel across 21 major cities of the province.[34] The flame of the torch was lit at the Great Wall of China
Great Wall of China
on October 9, 2010, and traveled around the Temple of Heaven
Temple of Heaven
in Beijing. As originally scheduled 21 cities were present in the list of relay, with 2,010 torchbearers expected to carry it from October 12 to November 12, 2010; however, two more cities —  Changchun
Changchun
and Haiyang, the host of 2007 Asian Winter Games
2007 Asian Winter Games
and 2012 Asian Beach Games respectively, were also later added to the route for a single day on October 15, 2010, increasing the number of torchbearers to 2,068 people.[35][36][37] Calendar[edit] In the following calendar for the 2010 Asian Games, each blue box represents an event competition, such as a qualification round, on that day. The yellow boxes represent days during which medal-awarding finals for a sport were held. Each bullet in these boxes is an event final, the number of bullets per box representing the number of finals that were contested on that day. On the left the calendar lists each sport with events held during the Games, and at the right how many gold medals were won in that sport. There is a key at the top of the calendar to aid the reader.[38]

 OC  Opening ceremony  ●   Event competitions  1  Event finals  CC  Closing ceremony

November 2010 7th Sun 8th Mon 9th Tue 10th Wed 11th Thu 12th Fri 13th Sat 14th Sun 15th Mon 16th Tue 17th Wed 18th Thu 19th Fri 20th Sat 21st Sun 22nd Mon 23rd Tue 24th Wed 25th Thu 26th Fri 27th Sat Gold medals

Aquatics – Diving

2 2 2 2 2

10

Aquatics – Swimming

6 6 7 7 6 1

38

Aquatics – Synchronized swimming

1 1 1

3

Aquatics – Water polo

 ●  ●  ●  ● 1

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●

1

2

Archery

 ●  ● 1 1 1 1

4

Athletics

6 6 8 4 11 10 2 47

Badminton

 ●  ● 2  ●  ●  ● 1 2 2

7

Baseball

 ●  ●  ●

 ●  ● 1

1

Basketball

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●

 ● 1 1

2

Board games – Chess

 ●  ●  ● 2

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 2

4

Board games – Weiqi

 ●  ● 1  ●  ●  ● 2

3

Board games – Xiangqi

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 2

2

Bowling

1 1 1 1  ● 2  ● 4  ● 2

12

Boxing

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●

  6 7

13

Canoeing – Slalom

● 2 ● 2

4

Canoeing – Sprint

● ●

6 6

12

Cricket

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 1  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 1

2

Cue sports

 ● 2 2 1 1 2 1 1

10

Cycling – BMX

2

2

Cycling – Mountain bike

2

2

Cycling – Road

2

1 1

4

Cycling – Track

1 3  ● 2 4

10

Dancesport

5 5

10

Dragon boat

2 2 2

6

Equestrian

1 ●

1 ● ● 2

1

1

6

Fencing

2 2 2 2 2 2

12

Football  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●

 ●  ●  ●  ●

 ●  ●  ●

1  ●

1

2

Golf

 ●  ●  ● 4

4

Gymnastics – Artistic

1 1 2 5 5

14

Gymnastics – Rhythmic

1 1

2

Gymnastics – Trampoline

 ● 2

2

Handball

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 2

2

Field hockey

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 1 1

2

Judo

4 4 4 4

16

Kabaddi

 ●  ●  ●  ● 2

2

Karate

5 4 4

13

Modern pentathlon

2 2

4

Roller sports

4 2  ● 3

9

Rowing

 ●  ●  ●

7 7

14

Rugby sevens

 ●  ● 2

2

Sailing

 ●  ●  ●  ●

 ● 14

14

Sepaktakraw

 ●  ●  ●  ● 2

 ●  ● 2  ●  ● 2 6

Shooting

6 4 8 4 6 4 4

4

2 2

44

Softball

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●

 ● 1

1

Soft tennis

 ● 2 1  ● 2  ● 2

7

Squash

 ●  ●  ● 2  ●  ●  ● 2

4

Table tennis

 ●  ●  ● 2  ●  ● 3 2

7

Taekwondo

4 4 4 4

16

Tennis

 ●  ●  ● 2  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 3 2

7

Triathlon

1 1

2

Volleyball – Beach

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 1 1

2

Volleyball – Indoor

 ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ●  ● 1 1 2

Weightlifting

2 2 2 2 2 2 3

15

Wrestling

3 3 3 3 3 3

18

Wushu

2 2 2 2 7

15

Ceremonies

OC

CC

Total gold medals

28 35 30 37 39 33 36 30 31 26 30 29 39 48 5 476

Cumulative Total

28 63 93 130 169 202 238 268 299 325 355 384 423 471 476

November 2010 7th Sun 8th Mon 9th Tue 10th Wed 11th Thu 12th Fri 13th Sat 14th Sun 15th Mon 16th Tue 17th Wed 18th Thu 19th Fri 20th Sat 21st Sun 22nd Mon 23rd Tue 24th Wed 25th Thu 26th Fri 27th Sat Gold medals

Games[edit]

Firework display at the Canton Tower

Opening ceremony[edit] Main article: 2010 Asian Games
Asian Games
opening ceremony The opening ceremony officially began on November 12, 2010 at 20:00 local time. For the first time in history, the ceremony was not held inside a stadium; instead, it was held along the Pearl River on Haixinsha Island.[39] The ceremony was directed by Chen Weiya, assistant director of the 2008 Summer Olympics
2008 Summer Olympics
in Beijing, and featured a cast of about 6,000 performers.[40] It was attended by the Chinese Premier, Wen Jiabao,[41] President of Pakistan
President of Pakistan
Asif Ali Zardari,[42] Prime Minister of Thailand
Prime Minister of Thailand
Abhisit Vejjajiva,[43] Chief Secretary for Administration of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Henry Tang,[44] as well as President of the Olympic Council of Asia
Olympic Council of Asia
(OCA), Ahmed Al-Fahad Al-Ahmed Al-Sabah and President of International Olympic Committee Jacques Rogge.[45] The ceremony lasted for three hours, and together with the closing ceremony costed about ¥380 million (US$57.19 million).[46] Athletes were paraded by boats along the Pearl River. The ceremony featured the water-themed arts show and culture of Guangzhou. The last torchbearer, diver He Chong
He Chong
lit up the cauldron, after igniting the traditional Chinese firecrackers whose flare shot up to the top of the tower where the cauldron was held.[47][48] The ceremony was regarded as successful by IOC President Jacques Rogge who described it as "absolutely fantastic", and said that "Guangzhou has the ability to host the Olympics".[49][50] OCA director general Husain Al-Musallam praised the Games saying that it was unique, fantastic and "just better than the Beijing
Beijing
Olympics".[51] Sports[edit] 476 events were held in 42 sports, including the 26 sports contested at the 2012 Summer Olympics, and additional non-Olympic sports. This marked an increase from the 424 events in 39 sports hosted in 2006.[52][53] The OCA approved Cricket
Cricket
(Twenty20) for inclusion in the main programme, while events were also held in dancesport, dragon boat, weiqi and roller sport were also held in Guangzhou.[54][55] Bodybuilding
Bodybuilding
was dropped following criticism over the quality of judging in the competition at the 2006 Games.[56]

Aquatics

Diving Swimming Synchronized swimming Water polo

Archery Athletics Badminton Baseball Basketball Board games

Chess Weiqi Xiangqi

Bowling Boxing

Canoeing

Slalom Sprint

Cricket Cue sports Cycling

BMX Mountain bike Road Track

Dancesport Dragon boat Equestrian

Dressage Eventing Jumping

Fencing Field hockey Football Golf Gymnastics

Artistic Rhythmic Trampoline

Handball Judo Kabaddi Karate Modern pentathlon Roller sports

Artistic Speed

Rowing

Rugby sevens Sailing Sepaktakraw Shooting Soft tennis Softball Squash Table tennis Taekwondo Tennis Triathlon Volleyball

Beach Indoor

Weightlifting Wrestling Wushu

Closing ceremony[edit] The closing ceremony began on November 27, 2010 at 20:06 local time in front of 35,000 spectators.[57] The show began with the theme "Leave Your Song Here", which included music and dance from China, India, Indonesia, Lebanon, Japan, Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
and Mongolia.[3] The ceremony featured songs from different cultures– Indian "Saajan ji Ghar Aaye" and "Aao re Jhumo re",[58] Indonesian "Sing Sing So" and Japanese "Sakura".[59] Various artists from Taiwan, Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and mainland China
China
performed "Triumphant Return" (凯旋), among them were Alan Tam, Leo Ku
Leo Ku
and Hacken Lee.[59] The ceremony also included an eight-minute segment from Incheon
Incheon
with singer and actor Rain performing the segment.[60] The Mayor of Incheon Song Young-gil received the Games flag for 2014 Games.[61] The closing ceremony ended with the song "Everyone" (每一个人) and "Cheer for Asia" (为亚细亚喝彩).[62] Medal table[edit] Main article: 2010 Asian Games
Asian Games
medal table China
China
led the medal table for the eighth consecutive time with a new record for the most number of gold medals (at 199 gold medals) won in a single Games. This bettered their previous record of 183 gold medals won by China
China
at Beijing
Beijing
in 1990.[2] Macau,[63] and Bangladesh won their first Asian Games
Asian Games
gold medal from wushu and cricket, respectively.[64] Some 35 NOCs (except Kuwait who competed under the Olympic flag) won at least a single medal with 27 NOCs winning at least a single gold medal, thus leaving nine NOCs failing to win any medal at the Games. The top ten ranked NOCs at these Games are listed below. The host nation, China, is highlighted.

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total

1  China (CHN) 199 119 98 416

2  South Korea (KOR) 76 65 91 232

3  Japan (JPN) 48 74 94 216

4  Iran (IRI) 20 15 24 59

5  Kazakhstan (KAZ) 18 23 38 79

6  India (IND) 14 17 34 65

7  Chinese Taipei (TPE) 13 16 38 67

8  Uzbekistan (UZB) 11 22 23 56

9  Thailand (THA) 11 9 32 52

10  Malaysia (MAS) 9 18 14 41

Total 477 479 621 1577

Participating nations[edit]

Participating countries

All 45 members of the Olympic Council of Asia
Olympic Council of Asia
that existed as of 2010 participated in the 2010 Asian Games. All National Olympic Committees were ordered to submit their entries before September 30, 2010. Organizers allowed each NOC to submit additional entries and injury replacements after the deadline. After the final registration deadline, some 9,704 athletes, as well as some 4,750 team officials, took part in the Games, an increase of 184 athletes from the previous Asian Games
Asian Games
in Doha.[65] According to the Games' official website, Kuwaiti athletes participated the Games under the Olympic flag
Olympic flag
because the Kuwait Olympic Committee
Kuwait Olympic Committee
was suspended due to political interference in January 2010.[66] Below is a list of all the participating NOCs; the number of competitors per delegation is indicated in brackets.

 Afghanistan (66)[67]  Bahrain (82)[68]  Bangladesh (150)[69]  Bhutan (11)[70]  Brunei (9)[71]  Cambodia (22)[72]  China (960)[73]  Hong Kong (401)[74]  India (626)[75]  Indonesia (216)[76]  Iran (362)[77]  Iraq (42)[78]  Japan (726)[79]  Jordan (86)[80]  Kazakhstan (365)[81]  North Korea (188)[82]  South Korea (788)[83]  Athletes from Kuwait (184)[84]  Kyrgyzstan (135)[85]  Laos (53)[86]  Lebanon (49)[87]  Macau (168)[88]  Malaysia (325)[89]  Maldives (82)[90]  Mongolia (219)[91]  Myanmar (69)[92]  Nepal (140)[93]  Oman (52)[94]  Pakistan (169)[95]  Palestine (41)[96]  Philippines (188)[97]  Qatar (250)[98]  Saudi Arabia (164)[99]  Singapore (240)[100]  Sri Lanka (104)[101]  Syria (44)[102]  Chinese Taipei (399)[103]  Tajikistan (67)[104]  Thailand (593)[105]  East Timor (23)[106]  Turkmenistan (111)[107]  United Arab Emirates (84)[108]  Uzbekistan (220)[109]  Vietnam (260)[110]  Yemen (32)[111]

Controversies[edit] Sports[edit] Cricket
Cricket
was among the five début sports in the Games. India, despite its historical record, decided not to send its cricket team to the Games. According to the Board of Control for Cricket
Cricket
in India, the decision was due to other international commitments.[112] However, its main rivals, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, confirmed their participation.[113] In ten-pin bowling, the Asian Bowling Federation decided to compete the Games behind closed doors, this resulted in protests from many delegates.[114] On November 17, Yang Shu-chun
Yang Shu-chun
of Chinese Taipei, was abruptly disqualified with 12 seconds left in the first round of the taekwondo competition, while leading her opponent 9–0. She was accused of having installed illegal sensors on the heel of her socks.[115][116] The event quickly turned into an international incident, with officials, politicians and public opinion from Chinese Taipei, China and South Korea
South Korea
trading accusations of manipulation and fraud.[117] About 1,400 random doping tests were carried out during the Games.[118] Two athletes tested positive; judoka Shokir Muminov on November 19, 2010 and Greco-Roman wrestler Jakhongir Muminov on November 24, 2010, both from Uzbekistan, tested positive for methylhexanamine.[119] On January 24, 2011, the OCA announced another two doping failures, Qatari's Ahmed Dheeb who tested positive for exogenous testosterone metabolites and Palestinian Awajna Abdalnasser who tested positive for 19-Norandrosterone.[120] Languages[edit] In July 2010, the citizens of Guangzhou
Guangzhou
opposed the proposal suggested by the city committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) to use Mandarin more in television news programmes, rather than Guangzhou's main language, Cantonese.[121] The debates eventually led to a series of public protests. In late October 2010, in order to protest the government over the language policy in Tibetan area, the Tibetan Youth Congress (TYC) used the games as a channel to voice their concern.[122] Environment[edit] Like the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, Guangzhou
Guangzhou
also attempted to raise the air quality of the city. The authority had pledged ¥600 million to fight the problem, and had ordered around 32 chemical plants to stop production by the end of 2009.[123] A report shown on July 13, 2010 indicates that the air quality was rated at 95.07% in 2009, an increase of 12.01% since 2004;[124] this improvement eventually cost authorities ¥24 billion.[125] Later action from organisers to curb the pollution included decreasing the movement of vehicles up to 40 percent and banning barbecue stalls in 11 cities.[126][127] Between 2005 and 2008 about 150 Guolang villagers survived by growing tomatoes, beans and cabbages while fighting the government for fairer compensation after their homes were flattened for Asian games infrastructure. The Panyu government set aside a date to listen to petitioners complaint on October 18, 2010.[128] Prior to the opening of the games, Conghua
Conghua
reported 429 cases of Norovirus
Norovirus
outbreak. The government officials stressed that the people recovered before November 12.[129] See also[edit]

Asian Games
Asian Games
portal

2010 Asian Para Games 2008 Summer Olympics List of IOC country codes

References[edit]

^ "Official Emblem of the 16th Asian Games". China
China
Daily. August 11, 2010. Retrieved May 2, 2011.  ^ a b " China
China
ends Asian Games
Asian Games
on high note". CNN International. November 27, 2010. Retrieved November 28, 2010.  ^ a b " Asian Games
Asian Games
close with China
China
dominant". Pakistan Times. November 27, 2010. Archived from the original on January 2, 2011. Retrieved November 28, 2010.  ^ " Lin Dan
Lin Dan
voted Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asian Games
Asian Games
Samsung MVP". gz2010.cn. November 27, 2010. Retrieved November 26, 2010.  ^ Ali, Muhammad (November 28, 2010). " South Korea
South Korea
to host 17th Asiad in Incheon
Incheon
in 2014". Daily Times. Retrieved November 28, 2010.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
wins Asiad bid". News Guangdong. July 2, 2004. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ "Korea withdrew from 2010 Asian Games
Asian Games
bidding". News Guangdong. March 25, 2004. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ " Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur
quits, GZ becomes only bidding city". News Guangdong. April 15, 2004. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ " Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur
drops Asian Games
Asian Games
bid". News Guangdong. April 16, 2004. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ Liang, Yan (November 27, 2006). "2010 Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asian Games' emblem unveiled". Xinhua. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ "Mascots for Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asian Games
Asian Games
unveiled". GAGOC. April 30, 2008. Archived from the original on April 11, 2010. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ "The story behind Le Yangyang and his Friends, the Official Mascots of the Guangzhou
Guangzhou
2010 Asian Games". GAGOC. April 30, 2008. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ "Mascot for 16th Asian Games
Asian Games
to be held in 2010 unveiled". Beijing2008.cn. April 29, 2008. Archived from the original on October 29, 2010. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ 张莹 (October 1, 2010). "'Reunion' announced as Guangzhou
Guangzhou
2010 theme song". NewsGD.com. Retrieved October 3, 2010.  ^ "孙楠毛阿敏成亚运歌手 《重逢》MV将取景广州塔". 2010.163.com (in Chinese). October 8, 2010. Archived from the original on October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 9, 2010.  ^ " Asian Games
Asian Games
to cost ¥2b". China
China
daily. March 11, 2005. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ "GZ to spend 200 billion yuan on Asiad construction". News Guangdong. July 1, 2004. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ "Lacking Sponsors, Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asks Beijing
Beijing
for Help on the 2010 Asian Games". China
China
Sports Review. March 13, 2009. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ "Govt. seeks Asian Games
Asian Games
bid details". The Hindu. July 14, 2010. Archived from the original on July 17, 2010. Retrieved July 14, 2010.  ^ Tong, Xiong (October 13, 2010). " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asian Games, Asian Para Games to cost over 18 bln USD". Xinhuanet. Retrieved October 14, 2010.  ^ Xu (March 3, 2011). " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Promises to Release Asiad Spending Details Before 2013". Crienglish.com. Retrieved November 30, 2014.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asian Games' new venues constructed". People's Daily Online. May 13, 2010. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ "RMB15 billion poured into major Asian Games
Asian Games
projects". english.gz.gov.cn. July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 6, 2010.  ^ " Asian Games
Asian Games
OC/CC venue set for August completion". Olympic Council of Asia. June 28, 2010. Retrieved June 30, 2010.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Airport upgrade". Crispant. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ Leiying, Xu (October 23, 2010). "Tourism Flourishes along High-Speed Railway". CRI. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
to remove 40 pct of vehicles from roads during Asian Games". Xinhuanet. October 23, 2010. Archived from the original on October 30, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ "GAC Bus Offers 1000 Buses for Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asian Games". China
China
Buses. November 12, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ "During the Asian Games, 3 days public holiday in Guangzhou". Travel Notes China. September 28, 2010. Archived from the original on October 23, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
cancels free-ride service". China
China
Daily. November 17, 2010. Archived from the original on November 10, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ Quanlin, Qiu (November 8, 2010). "Cash subsidy replaces free ride in Guangzhou". China
China
Daily. Archived from the original on November 11, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ "Two Torch Designs Shortlisted for Guangzhou
Guangzhou
2010 Asian Games". Sports Biz Asia. September 22, 2009. Retrieved July 1, 2010.  ^ GAGOC (November 8, 2010). "The Tide relayed in Huangpu". 2010 Asian Games' official website. Archived from the original on May 24, 2011. Retrieved May 5, 2011.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asian Games
Asian Games
torch relay to stay inside China". Reuters. March 5, 2009. Retrieved July 1, 2010.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
unveils Asian Games
Asian Games
torch relay route". People's Daily Online. March 4, 2010. Retrieved July 1, 2010.  ^ "Capital date for Asian Games
Asian Games
flame". COC. June 4, 2010. Retrieved July 2, 2010.  ^ 冼东妹成广州亚运会首批火炬手 北京传递她压轴. Sina Sports (in Chinese). October 10, 2010. Retrieved October 16, 2010.  ^ "Schedule & Results". gz2010.cn. Archived from the original on May 24, 2011. Retrieved May 7, 2011.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asiad opening ceremony to be held along Pearl River". Xinhuanet. November 8, 2010. Retrieved November 11, 2010.  ^ "Romance never out of style". China.org.cn. November 13, 2010. Archived from the original on November 21, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ " Asian Games
Asian Games
sets sail on Pearl River". Xinhua News Agency. November 12, 2010. Retrieved May 7, 2011.  ^ "Zardari to visit China
China
for Asiad opening ceremony". Zee News. November 10, 2010. Retrieved November 11, 2010.  ^ "PM to visit China
China
and Japan
Japan
Nov 12–14". MCOT. November 11, 2010. Retrieved November 11, 2010.  ^ "CS to attend Asian Games
Asian Games
opening ceremony". 7thspace.com. November 10, 2010. Retrieved November 11, 2010.  ^ "2010 Asian Games
Asian Games
Opening Ceremony". All Voices. November 12, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
spent lot less than Doha
Doha
on opening ceremony". Sify Sports. November 13, 2010. Archived from the original on November 24, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ "Floating athletes, silent streets launch Asian Games". Monster & Critics. November 12, 2010. Archived from the original on November 13, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ " Asian Games
Asian Games
2010 begins with a glittering note!". DuniyaLive.com. November 13, 2010. Archived from the original on November 13, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ "Rogge full of praise for Asian Games
Asian Games
opening ceremony". MSN News. November 13, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ "IOC chief says Guangzhou
Guangzhou
could host Olympics". AFP. November 13, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asiad opening better than Beijing, says OCA". The Times of India. November 14, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ "Asian Games – Doha
Doha
2006". Olympic Council of Asia. Retrieved May 7, 2011.  ^ 张海燕 (July 22, 2010). 广州亚运会赛程最终确定 最多一天将产48金. People.com.cn (in Chinese). Retrieved July 22, 2010.  ^ "Asiad: OCA green lights cricket for 2010 Asian Games". Philippine Daily Inquirer. April 17, 2007. Retrieved July 7, 2010.  ^ "New sports to be introduced at Asian Games
Asian Games
2010". Chinaview.cn. September 19, 2007. Retrieved July 2, 2010.  ^ Letchumanan, Jaiarajo (April 23, 2007). " Bodybuilding
Bodybuilding
Dropped From 2010 Asian Games". Bernama. Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved July 2, 2010.  ^ 张勇 (July 22, 2010). 亚运开幕式细节揭秘:珠江大巡游 开幕序曲确定. SZNews (in Chinese). Retrieved July 22, 2010.  ^ K Samyal, Sanjjeev (November 27, 2010). "Asian Games: The closing ceremony a whimper". Daily News & Analysis. Retrieved November 28, 2010.  ^ a b 揭秘广州亚运会闭幕式 海心沙变身歌剧院. jxnews (in Chinese). November 25, 2010. Retrieved November 28, 2010.  ^ "Korean pop star Rain to sing at Asiad close". The Jakarta Post. November 26, 2010. Retrieved November 26, 2010.  ^ "2010 Asian Games
Asian Games
Being Held in Guangzhou, Then Incheon". Business Wire. November 24, 2010. Retrieved November 26, 2010.  ^ 闭幕式压轴节目曝光 歌曲《每一个人》熄灭圣火. Sohu Sports (in Chinese). November 26, 2010. Retrieved December 12, 2010.  ^ "A hero for Macao, a lover of Kongfu". Xinhuanet. November 14, 2010. Retrieved November 27, 2010.  ^ "Bangladesh wins first Asian Games
Asian Games
gold medal". BBC News. November 26, 2010. Archived from the original on November 27, 2010. Retrieved November 27, 2010.  ^ "Record entry for Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Asian Games". gz2010.cn. November 10, 2010. Archived from the original on November 14, 2010. Retrieved November 11, 2010.  ^ "Political interference alleged". ESPN. January 5, 2010. Archived from the original on October 13, 2010. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Afghanistan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Bahrain – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Bangladesh – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Bhutan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Brunei set to send 9 athletes to Asian Games". The Brunei Times. October 17, 2010. Retrieved October 20, 2010.  ^ "Cambodia – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "China – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Hong Kong, China – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "India – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Indonesia – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Iran – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Iraq – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Japan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Jordan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Kazakhstan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "North Korea send largest ever delegation to Asian Games". The Times of India. November 4, 2010. Retrieved November 4, 2010.  ^ "R.O. Korea – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Athletes from Kuwait – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Kyrgyzstan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Lao PDR – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Lebanon – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Macao, China – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Malaysia – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Maldives – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Mongolia – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Myanmar – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Nepal – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Oman – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Pakistan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Palestine – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Philippines – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Qatar – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Saudi Arabia – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Singapore – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Archived from the original on November 14, 2010. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Sri Lanka – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Archived from the original on November 12, 2010. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Syria – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Chinese Taipei – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Tajikistan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Thailand – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Timor-Leste – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Archived from the original on December 13, 2010. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Turkmenistan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "United Arab Emirates – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "Uzbekistan – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ "260 Vietnamese athletes to attend ASIAD 2010". VietNamNet. October 20, 2010. Archived from the original on October 27, 2010. Retrieved October 20, 2010.  ^ "Yemen – Number of Entries by Sport". gz2010.cn. Retrieved November 9, 2010.  ^ Mohapatra, Bikash (June 1, 2010). "Indian cricket team to skip Asian Games". Rediff Sports. Archived from the original on July 15, 2010. Retrieved July 16, 2010.  ^ Welmilla, Hishan (October 24, 2010). "From Delhi To Guangzhou". The Sunday Leader. Retrieved October 24, 2010.  ^ "No seats for Tenpin bowling spectators". The Gulf Today. November 13, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ "Taiwan fury after athlete's Asian Games
Asian Games
disqualification in China". CNN. November 17, 2010. Retrieved November 19, 2010.  ^ Chang, Anita (November 19, 2010). "Officials: taekwondo athlete clearly broke rules". Associated Press. Retrieved November 19, 2010.  ^ "Korean flags burned as Taiwan rages over Asian Games
Asian Games
incident". CNN. November 18, 2010. Retrieved November 19, 2010.  ^ "Boffo Ending to Massive Asian Games". Scoop World. November 28, 2010. Retrieved November 28, 2010.  ^ Ransom, Ian (November 24, 2010). "Second Uzbek athlete caught doping at Asian Games". Reuters India. Retrieved November 27, 2010.  ^ "More doping failures at 2010 Asian Games". The Straits Times. January 24, 2011. Retrieved January 24, 2011.  ^ Shasha, Deng (July 9, 2010). "Proposal for news in Mandarin angers Guangzhou
Guangzhou
citizens". Xinhuanet. Archived from the original on July 16, 2010. Retrieved July 10, 2010.  ^ "Tibetan Body Protests Hosting of Asian Games
Asian Games
by China". outlookindia.com. October 7, 2010. Retrieved January 10, 2011.  ^ Qianlin, Qiu (July 13, 2009). " Guangzhou
Guangzhou
to ensure better air quality for Asian Games". China
China
Daily. Retrieved July 14, 2010.  ^ 亚运会环保工作受肯定 空气质量优良率达95.07%. 信息时报 (in Chinese). July 14, 2010. Archived from the original on July 15, 2010. Retrieved July 14, 2010.  ^ 杨明 (July 22, 2010). 穗投24亿改善空气迎亚运 环保部官员赞空气清洁. 2010.163.com (in Chinese). Archived from the original on July 23, 2010. Retrieved July 22, 2010.  ^ " China
China
to reduce vehicles during Asian Games". OneIndia. October 25, 2010. Archived from the original on December 22, 2011. Retrieved October 26, 2010.  ^ "China's Guangdong
Guangdong
province bans barbecue stalls in 11 cities ahead of Asian Games". Sify. October 26, 2010. Retrieved October 26, 2010.  ^ SCMP. Games euphoria fails to impress villagers, Nov 16, 2010. ^ Jingya, Zhang (December 17, 2010). " Norovirus
Norovirus
infects 429 people in Guangzhou". CNTV. Retrieved December 19, 2010. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2010 Asian Games.

Official website Guangzhou
Guangzhou
2010 at Olympic Council of Asia

Preceded by Doha Asian Games Guangzhou XVI Asiad (2010) Succeeded by Incheon

v t e

Asian Games

Sports OCA NOCs Medal table Mascots

Summer Games

1951 New Delhi 1954 Manila 1958 Tokyo 1962 Jakarta 1966 Bangkok 1970 Bangkok 1974 Tehran 1978 Bangkok 1982 New Delhi 1986 Seoul 1990 Beijing 1994 Hiroshima 1998 Bangkok 2002 Busan 2006 Doha 2010 Guangzhou 2014 Incheon 2018 Jakarta–Palembang 2022 Hangzhou 2026 Nagoya

Winter Games

1986 Sapporo 1990 Sapporo 1996 Harbin 1999 Kangwon 2003 Aomori 2007 Changchun 2011 Astana–Almaty 2017 Sapporo 2021

Category Portal WikiProject

Asian Beach Games Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games Asian Youth Games Asian Para Games

v t e

Nations at the 2010 Asian Games
Asian Games
in Guangzhou, China

Afghanistan Bahrain Bangladesh Bhutan Brunei Cambodia China Chinese Taipei East Timor Hong Kong India Indonesia Iran Iraq Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Laos Lebanon Macau Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Myanmar Nepal North Korea Oman Pakistan Palestine Philippines Qatar Saudi Arabia Singapore South Korea Sri Lanka Syria Tajikistan Thailand Turkmenistan United Arab Emirates Uzbekistan Vietnam Yemen Athletes from Kuwait

v t e

Events at the 2010 Asian Games
Asian Games
(Guangzhou)

Archery Athletics Badminton Baseball Basketball Beach volleyball Bowling Boxing Canoeing Chess Cricket Cue sports Cycling Dancesport Diving Dragon boat Equestrian Fencing Field hockey Football Go Golf Gymnastics Handball Judo Kabaddi Karate Modern pentathlon Roller sports Rowing Rugby sevens Sailing Sepak takraw Shooting Soft tennis Softball Squash Swimming Synchronized swimming Table tennis Taekwondo Tennis Triathlon Volleyball Water polo Weightlifting Wrestling W